Posts Tagged‘azure web sites’

Azure Websites Stats

The Ups and Downs of a Weekend Developing on Azure.

I heap a lot of praise on Windows Azure here, enough for me to start thinking about how that’s making me sound like a Microsoft shill, but honestly I think it’s well deserved. As someone who’s spent the better part of a decade setting up infrastructure for applications to run on and then began developing said applications in its spare time I really do appreciate not having to maintain another set of infrastructure. Couple that with the fact that I’m a full Microsoft stack kind of guy it’s really hard to beat the tight integration between all of the products in the cloud stack, from the development tools to the back end infrastructure. So like many of my weekends recently I spent the previous coding away on the Azure platform and it was filled with some interesting highs and rather devastating lows.

Azure Websites StatsI’ll start off with the good as it was really the highlight of my development weekend. I had promised to work on a site for a long time friend’s upcoming wedding and whilst I had figured out the majority of it I hadn’t gotten around to cleaning it up for a first shot to show off to him. I spent the majority of my time on the project getting the layout right, wrangling JavaScript/jQuery into behaving properly and spending an inordinate amount of time trying to get the HTML to behave the way I wanted it to. Once I had gotten it into an acceptable state I turned my eyes to deploying it and that’s where Azure Web Sites comes into play.

For the uninitiated Azure Web Sites are essentially a cut down version of the Azure Web Role allowing you to run pretty much full scale web apps for a fraction of the cost. Of course this comes with limitations and unless you’re running on at the Reserved tier you’re essentially sharing a server with a bunch of people (I.E. a common multi-tenant scenario). For this site, which isn’t going to receive a lot of traffic, it’s perfect and I wanted to deploy the first run app onto this platform. Like any good admin I simply dove in head first without reading any documentation on the process and to my surprise I was up and running in a matter of minutes. It was pretty much create web site, download publish profile, click Publish in Visual Studio, import profile and wait for the upload to finish.

Deploying a web site on my own infrastructure would be a lot more complicated as I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to chase down dependency issues or missing libraries that I have installed on my PC but not on the end server. The publishing profile coupled with the smarts in Visual Studio was able to resolve everything (the deployment console shows the whole process, it was actually quite cool to watch) and have it up and running at my chosen URL in about 10 minutes total. It’s very impressive considering this is still considered preview level technology, although I’m more inclined to classify it as a release candidate.

Other Azure users can probably guess what I’m going to write about next. Yep, the horrific storage problems that Azure had for about 24 hours.

I noticed some issues on Friday afternoon when my current migration (yes that one, it’s still going as I write this) started behaving…weird. The migration is in its last throws and I expected the CPU usage to start ramping down as the multitude of threads finished their work and this lined up with what I was seeing. However I noticed the number of records migrated wasn’t climbing up at the rate it was previously (usually indicative of some error happening that I suppressed in order for the migration to run faster) but the logs showed that it was still going, just at a snail’s pace. Figuring it was just the instance dying I reimaged it and then the errors started flooding in.

Essentially I was disconnected from my NOSQL storage so whilst I could browse my migrated database I couldn’t keep pulling records out. This also had the horrible side effect of not allowing me to deploy anything as it would come back with SSL/TLS connection issues. Googling this led to all sorts of random posts as the error is also shared by the libraries that power the WebClient in .NET so it wasn’t until I stumbled across the ZDNet article that I knew I wasn’t in the wrong. Unfortunately you were really up the proverbial creek without a paddle if your Azure application was based on this as the temporary fixes for this issue, either disabling SSL for storage connections or usurping the certificate handler, left your application rather vulnerable to all sorts of nasty attacks. I’m one of the lucky few who could simply do without until it was fixed but it certainly highlighted the issues that can occur with PAAS architectures.

Honestly though that’s the only issue (that’s not been directly my fault) I’ve had with Azure since I started using it at the end of last year and comparing it to other cloud services it doesn’t fair too badly. It has made me think about what contingency strategy I’ll need to implement should any parts of the Azure infrastructure go away for a extended period of time though. For the moment I don’t think I’ll worry too much as I’m not going to be earning any income from the things I build on it but it will definitely be a consideration as I begin to unleash my products onto the world.