Posts Tagged‘challenges’

Mark of the Ninja Screenshot Wallpaper Upgrades and Archetype choice600px

Mark of the Ninja: For The Good of the Clan.

The simplicity of 2D platformer games must be really liberating for developers, especially small time independent ones. I say this because it seems that I’ve played a lot of games this year that fit into that genre and the amount of innovative game ideas that I’ve seen has really surprised me. These were the titles I grew up on and they were, for the most part, usually a small variation on the original Duke Nukem idea. One thing I didn’t expect was the introduction of stealth based game play something which has traditionally been contained to 3D games. Mark of the Ninja blends stealth along with puzzle solving and platforming to form a pretty unique game experience, one that doesn’t really have anything that I can directly compare it to.

Unlike most ninja games which take place in feudal Japan Mark of the Ninja is set during present day. You, an unnamed ninja, were receiving your first tattoo which would grant you special powers when you passed out. A short while later a fellow ninja, named Ora, wakes you up as the ninja stronghold is under attack by a security agency headed by a man named Karajan. After rescuing your fellow ninjas as well as your master, Azai, you’re then sent on a mission of vengeance against Karajan for the atrocities that he committed against your clan.

Mark of the Ninja has a style to it that’s reminiscent of all those flash animations of yesteryear but there’s a level of refinement about it that many of those lacked. The cut scenes for example feel like they came straight out of a professional animation house and wouldn’t be out of place in any cartoon you’d see on a Saturday morning. There’s also incredible amounts of detail everywhere from the interactive area which is littered with all sorts of things to the backgrounds which are done exceptionally well. This blends exceptionally well with the music and foley which provides a very detailed soundscape to compliment the impressive art work.

Mark of the Ninja is primarily a stealth game and its implementation in the 2D, platformer world is quite an interesting one. For starters unlike most 2D games Mark of the Ninja includes a line of sight mechanic which forms a big part of any stealth game. This means that you’ll spend the vast majority of your time walking between shadows, dodging guards where you can, so you can either sneak up behind guards and dispatch them quickly or just move on leaving them none-the-wiser. If it so pleases you though you can go toe to toe with every guard you meet however and there are some sections which will be far easier (and quicker) should you choose to do that.

Initially you start off with only a few tools at your disposal, namely your sword and bamboo darts that can be used to take out lights and other fixtures. As the game progresses you unlock additional abilities and equipment that allow for a much wider range of actions, enabling you do things like terrify your enemies by laying spike traps or dangling corpses from the room for all to see. All these options will mean that your play through is almost guaranteed to not be the same as anyone else’s as there just so many ways to go about doing the same thing.

Indeed that seems to be the whole point of Mark of the Ninja. Whilst it is primarily a 2D stealth platformer it also has many elements of a puzzler/exploration game as there are many rewards to be found by simply taking the least obvious path. I can’t tell you how many times I found artefacts/scrolls by going in the wrong direction or moving blocks in random ways. If you’re persistent enough too the most laborious of challenges can usually be circumvented by finding a path that leads around it or simply puts you behind the guards that were blocking your path. Mark of the Ninja then is a game that rewards the player for being curious but thankfully forgoes punishing you severely if you don’t.

The upgrade system bears mentioning as how many upgrades you can afford depends directly on: how many challenges you complete, your overall score and how many of the hidden scrolls you uncover. For each of these there are a potential 3 tokens up for grabs giving you a total of nine for each level. These can then be spent on various upgrades that either give you new abilities/equipment or upgrades to the ones you currently have. Depending on what you get this can completely change the way you play the game, especially if you combine these upgrades with one of the costumes which will grant you several benefits (usually at the cost of one particular trait).

This is usually the point where I mention any bugs or glitches that detracted from my game play experience but I’m pleased to report that there doesn’t seem to be any. Sure there were times when my character acted in a way I didn’t expect but its hard for me to blame the game for that as I get the feeling it was more me fat fingering the keys rather than the game engine wigging out on me. I did have some rather awkward checkpoint moments where it’d place me into locations that I hadn’t yet explored when reloading (which was actually great sometimes) putting me in rather precarious situations but it was nothing I couldn’t handle.

The story of Mark of the Ninja is also quite well done, especially considering it forgoes the usual ninja setting and instead brings the whole ninja idea into modern day. Whilst I didn’t really feel the levels of emotions like I did for things like To The Moon it certainly didn’t suffer from issues like poor voice acting, irrational characters or glaring plot holes like plagued other titles I’ve played recently. I will admit that I’m yet to finish it (I believe I’m on the second last mission) so I’m not sure about the ultimate conclusion but from what I’ve heard from my other friends they weren’t disappointed with it, so it has that going for it at least.

Mark of the Ninja effortlessly combines all the best aspects of 2D platformers with stealth game play to form a game that makes you feel like the ultimate ninja whilst still providing an incredibly satisfying challenge. The graphics are superbly done, the sound track excellent and above all the core game play is immensely satisfying. I could go on but really for a game that’s asking price is so low compared to its quality I’d rather just recommend you go out and play it since it’s really worth a play through.

Rating: 9.0/10

Mark of the Ninja is available on PC and Xbox360 right now for $14.99 and an equivalent amount of Xbox points. Game was played on the PC with around 6 hours of total game time and 43% of the achievements unlocked.

 

Unreasonable Expectations and Arbitrary Boundaries.

There’s an old saying that goes something along the lines of “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man“. As someone who had lived much of his life trying to learn the rules of the world so I could work within them the notion that being unreasonable about something would be the catalyst for progress was initially met with harsh scepticism. However I began to notice that the ones who actually managed to enact change were in fact those who were making unreasonable demands, not just of others but also of themselves. They also seemed to flourish within boundaries, seeming to be far more capable working with some kind artificial constraint than they were with completely open ended problems.

I really started to believe in this whole progress comes from being unreasonable idea when I started working on my own projects and I started running up against things that people had never come across before. Now for us .NET developers it’s pretty much guaranteed that you’re not the first one to run up against a certain problem since there are so many people out there developing with it. However following on from that idea you’ll tend to find then that if people can’t find a solution to particular issue they’ll instead find some other way of achieving the same goal that’s been done before. This is the double edged sword of Microsoft’s black magic and it definitely traps the wise programmers in the loop of adapting themselves instead of trying to make changes to the world they’re operating in.

I had this recently when I was working on my latest project. I was working with an ASP.NET MVC 3 site and I had set up the web site to make multiple calls back to the server in order to retrieve the data it needed. Now this worked well to get it off the ground but anyone looking to optimize a website will tell you reducing the number of calls to your server will lead to much better performance, for both the client and your server. Eliminating all these calls and wrapping them up into the @Model of the view for this part of the website would do that, but I had no idea of how to get the same results as I had done with the multiple requests. After searching, hacking and testing several different things I eventually found myself with a very workable solution and I was left for many more ideas for improvements to the site.

Now had I been more reasonable with my expectations I would’ve instead just kept on doing what I had been doing (since it was functional) and wouldn’t have dared to consider changing. Indeed I sat on the whole idea for a day before pulling the trigger on it, precisely because of the amount of rework that was involved in doing so. However the changes I made will make it far more easier going forward since it allows me to work in the areas I’m much more comfortable with rather than fooling around with technologies I’m still in the process of understanding. Sure going the other way might have been a better learning experience but I’ve learnt quite a lot in the process of overcoming the goal I set myself, perhaps more than I would have should I have continued down the same path.

Having unreasonable expectations frees you from being constrained by perceived limitations, allowing you to push to the very limits of what is possible. Arbitrary boundaries help to limit the problem space considerably enabling you to focus more clearly on the ultimate goal rather than getting stuck in the multitude of minutia. Combining these two ideas has helped me push past my own limitations in many aspects of my life, from coding to fitness and even to unlocking my hidden creative self. So I put it to you to start being more unreasonable in your expectations and using arbitrary limitations as enablers rather than blockers to progress.