Posts Tagged‘woes’

The Woes of Azure Table Storage.

I’m a stickler for avoiding rework where I can, opting instead to make the most of what I already have before I set out on trying to rework something. You’d think that’d lead me to create overly complicated systems that have multiple nuances and edge cases but since I know I hate reworking stuff I’ll go out of my way to make things right the first time, even if it costs me a bit more initially. For the most part this works well and even when it comes time to dump something and start over again much of my previous work will make it into the reworked product, albeit it in a different form.

I hit such a dilemma last weekend when I was working on my latest project. As long time readers will know I’m a pretty big fan of Microsoft’s Azure services and I decided to use them as the platform for my next endeavour. For the most part it’s been quite good, getting started with the development environment was painless and once I got familiar with the features and limitations of the Azure platform I was able to create the basic application in almost no time at all. Everything was going great until I started to hit some of the fundamental limitations of one of Azure services, namely the Table Storage.

For the uninitiated Azure Table Storage is like a database, but not in the traditional sense. It’s one of them new fan dangled NoSQL type databases, the essential difference being that this kind of database doesn’t have a fixed schema or layout of how the data is stored. Considering that having a fixed layout of how the data is stored is where a database draws many of its advantages from you’d wonder what doing away with it would do for you. What it does is allow for a much higher level of scalability than a traditional database does and thus NoSQL type databases power many large apps, including things like Facebook and Twitter. Figuring that the app might be big one day (and Microsoft’s rather ludicrous pricing for SQL Azure) I settled on using it as my main data store.

However whilst there’s a lot of good things about Azure Table Storage there’s one downside that really hurts it’s usability: it’s limited query engine. You see whilst you can query it with good old fashioned LINQ the query parameters it supports are rather limited. In fact they’re limited to single parameter matches or boolean equivalences which, whilst working for a lot of use cases, doesn’t cater towards user constructed queries quite well. Indeed in my application where someone could search for a single name but the object could contain up to 8 (some of them set, some of them not) meant that I had to construct the query on the fly for the user. No problem I hear you say, LINQKit’s Predicate Builder can build that for you! Well you’d be wrong unfortunately since the resulting LINQ statement confuses the poor Azure Storage Client and the query errors out. 

So at this point I was faced with a difficult decision: manually crank out all the queries (which would end up being huge and ridiculously unmaintainable) whilst keeping my Table Storage back end or bite the bullet and move everything into SQL Azure. Whilst I knew that writing out the queries would be a one time only task (a very time consuming one) I couldn’t shake that feeling that doing that would just be the wrong thing to do in the long run, leaving me with an unmaintainable system that I’d curse constantly. I haven’t made the changes yet, that’s this weekend’s goal, but I know it’s not going to be as trouble free as I hope it will.

Sometimes you just have to swallow that bitter pill and it’s usually better to do it sooner rather than later. Azure Table Storage was perfect for me in the beginning  but as my requirements evolved the reality of the situation became apparent and I’m stuck in the unfortunate position of having to do rework that I tried so hard to avoid. My project and I will be better for it but it’s always tough when you’ve tried everything you could in order to avoid it and came up empty.