Posts Tagged‘frustration’

Getting Over It With Bennett Foddy: I Laugh, I Cry, I Continue.

The “frustration game” genre has developed a cult following over the last 5 years or so. Born out of the democratisation of game development tools these games are typically the spawn of newer developers looking to try their hand at making games. Not knowing how or not wanting to adhere to conventions they stumble about and end up creating experiences that are defined by their awkward, frustrating nature rather than being derided for it. There are, of course, those who set out to deliberately craft them and none are more infamous than Bennett Foddy who brought us flash games like QWOP, GIRP and CLOP. Getting Over It is his first ever full release and, in staying true to his previous accomplishments, is a brutal mishmash of awkward controls and punishing gameplay.

The game is an homage to a flash game called Sexy Hiking which was released some 16 years ago. You are a man in a cauldron called Diogenes and, armed with a rock climbing hammer you make your way up a mountain covered in various detritus. At any point in the game however you can make a wrong move and plummet all the way back down to the start. There are no checkpoints, no way to solidify your progress so you can continue from there. You will fail, sometimes spectacularly, and you’ll have to do what you did once again…and again…and again.

Getting Over It has all the trappings of what Foddy describes as “b games” which are akin to their b grade brethren from the silver screen. The game appears to be made almost entirely out of assets taken from the Unity store, all of them loosely cobbled together to form the level you’ll play through. There’s a surprising amount of attention to detail put into it however like the use of various different sound effects for different surfaces, your character’s utterances which are dependent on your actions and the inclusion of numerous physics enabled objects, typically done to throw you off your game. If I had to put it in one sentence I’d describe it as a beautifully put together trash pile.

The objective of the game is simple: make your way to the top of the mountain. To do this you have to wrangle your hammer in various ways to overcome the objects in front of you. The mechanics are pretty simple, the hammer will grip most surfaces and your character is strong enough to rotate themselves around an attachment point, but the controls don’t respond how you’d expect them to. The character’s arms are somewhat bound by realistic physics however things change dramatically with momentum and, depending on where his arms are positioned vs where your cursor is things might not go how you expect them. Honestly it’s hard to describe just how unintuitive the controls are as you’re better off just playing it yourself to see what I’m getting at.

Getting Over It does a good job of slowly introducing harder and harder puzzles to you although the difficulty curve takes a sharp spike up the further you progress. Quite often you’ll find yourself progressing without really understanding how you got there and, when you inevitably fall back down, will struggle to redo the section you just did. You’ll start to work out what strategies work for you however and eventually you’ll have a good idea of how to keep on moving forward.

That is until you reach here.

This corridor seems to have broken me and many others attempting this game. Whilst there are numerous strategies for getting through it I couldn’t get any of them to work reliably for me. Sure, I did make it past that point once, however I instantly catapulted myself off the top, sailing gracefully back down to the bottom. It was honestly so soul destroying that I couldn’t do anything but laugh for the next 5 minutes, my anguish best expressed in tears of laughter rather than sadness. I did make it back up there eventually but fell back down again not too shortly afterwards. It was then I decided to put the game down and watch a speed run on YouTube.

Indeed the stats show that this is pretty much typical for anyone playing this game. Half of people playing this game give up before they’ve played 1.3 hours and the average total play time is a meagre 3. Beyond that the minority who’ve managed to complete this game once average a total of 11.7 hours, or some 10x the amount of time I’ve spent in the game. Honestly I’d had my fill by then and am quite happy to say the game has beaten me. I’ve got much more interesting things to do with my life than continue to slam my head against this wall.

Getting Over It With Bennett Foddy is exactly what you’d expect from a game like this. It’s a horrifyingly awkward, frustrating game to play and it delights in tormenting you whenever you should fail. It is rewarding when you manage to complete a section but if you’re like me that doesn’t happen often enough to justify the continued time investment. There are some who will delight in this kind of no-holds-barred challenge and to them I commend you. For me though whilst it was a hilarious distraction it’s not something I’d recommend unless you knew what you’re getting into and even then I’d urge caution.

Rating: 7/10

Getting Over It With Bennett Foddy is available on PC and iOS right now for $7.99. Game was played on the PC with 1.6 hours of total play time and 0% of the achievements unlocked.

I am Bread: But Soon I Will Be Toast

A game’s controls being deliberately obtuse or unintuitive used to be a sign of a poorly designed game. Indeed the whole reason I avoid certain genres, survival horror being one of them, is that their controls are usually designed in a way that breaks your natural motions in order to induce extra challenge or panic. However most recently a new genre of games has popped up that thrives on this very idea, making games that use weird control schemes that are highly unintuitive and very specific to that game. These are often coupled with all sorts of weird and wonderful game play ideas, ones that really don’t fit the mould of any one genre. The latest title to fall under this banner (which I’ve tentatively termed Frustration Simulators) is I am Bread which should basically tell you everything you need to know about this weird indie experiment.

I am Bread Review Screenshot Wallpaper Title Screen

You are bread. You do not know how it came to be that you are bread but you do know your ultimate purpose: you become toast. For some reason though the person that brought you here doesn’t seem interested in supporting your goals so you must take it upon yourself to make yourself the goldeny treat you so desire to be. Indeed your quest seems to irritate your captor to no end with him putting you in all sorts of places where becoming toast is more easier said than done. But no matter, there are many ways to become toast and you shall do so until the final slice.

I am Bread feels a lot like the other simulator-esque games that have come before it like Surgeon Simulator and Goat Simulator. This is almost wholly due to its Unity and, from what I guess, are stock 3D models that they’ve used to create the worlds you’ll flopping yourself through. It’s not a bad aesthetic at all just one that’s become the default for titles like this much like all Flash games of years past shared a very similar look due to the limitations of the platform they were built on. The flip side of this is that I am Bread will likely run at anything you throw at it. This will likely be its boon when it comes to phones and tablets later this year.

I am Bread Review Screenshot Wallpaper Diagnoses

The goal of I am Bread is simple: you’re bread and you want to become toast. Initially this goal is an easy one to understand, you’re on one side of a kitchen and there’s a toaster thats on the other side which you have to get to. You do this by flopping yourself around which you can do by sticking one of your four corners to a surface and swinging around on that point. Whilst that might sound relatively easy there’s an awful lot of obstacles that stand in your way and should you hit them your edibility rating will start to plummet. You also have a limited amount of grip so you can’t simply throw yourself up on the room and tarzan your way across the room and hope for the best. After the first level though making yourself toast isn’t as straightforward of a challenge as it first was and this is where you have to get creative.

I am Bread tells you upfront that it’s better played with a controller and, after struggling to play the first section with a mouse and keyboard, I couldn’t agree with them more. However that’s not going to make the game easy, far from it, more it’s just slightly more intuitive when you’re using the shoulder buttons of a controller to control each of the four corners rather than the awkward keys they selected. You’ll still have to endure the steep learning curve for controlling your unwieldy piece of bread but after a while you’ll develop strategies to help you traverse sections faster and to avoid flopping around helplessly on the ground.

I am Bread Review Screenshot Wallpaper Ironing Bread

It seems the game’s time in Early Access was well spent as there’s mechanics to make the game more palatable if you’re struggling to make it past a particular section. Should you become inedible twice a power up will appear next to the starting point that gives you unlimited grip and edibility. You can choose not to take this however if you just want to explore or have fun triggering all the set pieces in the environment it means you don’t have to endure the tedium that these games are renown for. Suffice to say I only ever managed to complete a level once without having to resort to that buff but, honestly, had that buff not been there I would’ve put the game down after 10 minutes.

For me though games like I am Bread have somewhat limited appeal as whilst it’s fun to play around with experimental mechanics like this, coupled with the hilarious results of a semi-working physics engine, the sheen starts to wear thin rather quickly. I’m sure many will find a lot to love in getting high scores or finding new and inventive ways to cook themselves but I simply can’t find the appeal. This is not to say I am Bread is a bad game, far from it, more that if you’re not the kind of person that likes making their own challenge within a game then you’ll likely get bored with I am Bread after the first level.

I am Bread Review Screenshot Wallpaper Chillin on a Sunflower

I am Bread is a truly unique game that’s hard to find comparisons for as it really is unlike anything else that’s come before it. The control scheme, whilst being frustrating at the best of times, is what distinguishes I am Bread from your garden variety 3D platformer. The main game mechanic and the way it plays is charming, hilarious and satisfying when you finally achieve your ultimate goal. However since the core game doesn’t change much the replayability is incredibly low, meaning that for people like me the game starts to lose its appeal very quickly. Still if you were a fan of other frustration titles like this then you wouldn’t go astray with I am Bread and I’m sure you’d find much more to enjoy in it than I did.

Rating: 7.5/10

I am Bread is available on PC right now for $12.99. Total play time was approximately 2 hours.

Octodad: Dadliest Catch: DAMN YOU OCTOPUS!

In the past the only genre of game that could get away with being intentionally difficult to play was survival horror. The reasoning there was that it built tension, mimicking the feeling of panic you would feel should you find yourself in the same situation as is on screen. However the past couple years have given rise to a genre of games, all of them from independent developers, that hinge on the idea of being incredibly frustrating to play. It’s hard to understand the comedic effect that this usually has, typically resulting in a whole bunch of emergent game play characteristics that become the game’s main attraction. Octodad: Dadliest Catch is one such game, combining incredibly obtuse controls with ragdoll physics that results in much hilarity.

Octodad Dadliest Catch Review Screenshot Wallpaper Title Screen

You’re an octopus, one that’s managed to integrate himself into normal society to the point that everyone thinks you’re just a regular guy. Indeed even your wife and kids don’t know your secret, blissfully unaware of the chaos that seems to ensue wherever you go. There is one person though that knows who you are, a chef called Fujimoto, and he’s made it his only goal in life to reveal you for who you are and, most unfortunately, cook you up and serve you. What follows is the tale of you trying to integrate into society whilst attempting to flee Chef Fujimoto’s attempts to turn you into moderately priced sushi rolls.

Octodad reminds me of the educational games I use to play as a kid, having a distinctly cartoony style that uses heavily stylization. Initially I thought it was a Unity game as I’ve seen a couple other games with similar visual styles (kind of like how Flash games tended to look similar) but it’s actually a homegrown solution meaning the visual style is very deliberate. Whilst it’s not going to win awards I definitely like it and feel that it’s very fitting to the game. It also has the added bonus of making Octodad playable on pretty much anything which is great considering what a wide appeal the game itself has.

Octodad Dadliest Catch Review Screenshot Wallpaper RUN

As I alluded to earlier Octodad relies on the unpredictability of the controls to generate the majority of the challenge. Primarily you’ll be doing things that would be considered trivial in most games, picking up an item, moving an item, walking through a hallway of precariously placed objects, however you’ll likely be unable to do that without knocking something over or accidentally picking something up. This wouldn’t be an issue however anything out of the normal will attract the attention of nearby humans and, should you continue your flailing, the jig will be up and it will be back to the ocean for you.

The controls take a bit of getting used to as you have to constantly switch between modes in order to get things done. The first mode is where you can pick up and move objects about, simple enough you say, however the controls don’t translate like you think they would. Then when you switch to the movement mode all the rules you learnt in the other mode go out the window and now you’re on an eternal quest to put your feet in the right position whilst not knocking anything over. Thankfully the devs included snap points for a lot of the main objectives as otherwise there’d be hours of frustration in order to get things to work just right.

Octodad Dadliest Catch Review Screenshot Wallpaper Through the Jellies

Whilst the unpredictability of the physics engine is a feature, not a bug, there are a some unfortunate glitches which can be a tad annoying. You can get yourself into positions where the camera seems to forget where you are and no amount of movement spamming seems to bring it right (reloading a checkpoint will, however). There’s also no way to tell what surfaces you can and can’t adhere yourself to and even when you can the amount of gripping power you have seems to vary wildly depending on the situation. I will admit that the latter seems intentional to an extent but sometimes it felt like the game was punishing you for no reason in particular.

I was pleasantly surprised by Octodad’s story as whilst it’s lacking in depth it certainly isn’t lacking in heart. The subtitles for your lines are great, making you empathize with a character that, in all honesty, has no business being in the position that he’s in. It’s also acutely self aware of the absurdity of its own situation, thankfully not to the point of overdoing it like a lot of games tend to do. It’s the kind of story that I feel would be great for someone with kids as they’ll love the absurdity of Octodad’s flailing arms whilst learning a few things along the way.

Octodad Dadliest Catch Review Screenshot Wallpaper Frogiveness

Octodad: Dadliest catch is a charming indie frustration title that breaks away from many of the traditional game norms in favour of its own brand of absurdity. The game mechanics might not be complex, nor the puzzles particularly challenging, but it is a great deal of fun to play. The are some minor technical hiccups that mar the otherwise solid execution but they’re not game breaking and indeed you’d almost consider some of them part of the game itself. There’s a lot to like in Octodad: Dadliest catch and I’d definitely recommend a play through.

Rating: 8.75/10

Octodad: Dadliest Catch is available on PC and PlayStation4 right now for $14.99 on both platforms. Game was played on the PC with around 3 hours of total play time and 13% of the achievements unlocked.