Posts Tagged‘goal’

Rocket League: A Ball! Oh Boy oh Boy!

Before the days of ubiquitous broadband many of us would have to wait until the monthly LAN event to get our fix of multiplayer gaming. Of course this was also the time when the vast majority of games didn’t include some form of multiplayer so the long time between drinks was easy enough to handle. However since then the inclusion of some form of multiplayer in many games has diluted experiences that used to be specifically crafted for that purpose. Indeed the most rare of rare kind of multiplayer game, the one where you and bunch of mates would crowd around a TV to play, have shrunk down into a very specific niche. However there are still titles that come out every once in a while that exemplify that multiplayer-first experience of years gone by and Rocket League is one of them.

Rocket League Review Screenshot Wallpaper Title Screen

Rocket League is the sequel to the 2008 game Supersonic Acrobatic Rocket-Powered Battle Cars which was met with a rather lukewarm reception upon its release. Being a PlayStation3 only game, one with niche appeal at best, it’s easy to see why. Rocket League takes the same basic idea, rocket powered cars playing soccer, and modernizes the idea slightly, packaging it up for today’s gaming market. The reception this time around has been far more welcoming but looking back through videos of game play from its predecessor it’s hard to see the differences that make Rocket League that much more appealing. Still the buzz was more than enough to convince me that it was worth a look in.

On first glance you’d be forgiven for thinking that Rocket League runs on something other than the Unreal 3 engine as it does manage to do a lot with so little. Psyonix, the developer of Rocket League and its predecessor, does have something of a history with the engine having co-developed Unreal Tournament 2004. That experience has definitely come in handy as Rocket League looks great and runs fabulously, admittedly on my incredibly over-speced PC. One thing I did note however is that it doesn’t look anywhere near as good on the PlayStation4 as it does on the PC, even when running at the same resolution. That’s just my anecdotal experience however and I’m sure it’d look great on a much larger screen (I run my PlayStation4 through a HDMI capture card to my main PC monitor)


Rocket League Review Screenshot Wallpaper Time to Practice

At a basic level Rocket League is a simple game: get the ball into the opposing team’s goal. However instead of human players you’re driving around in what looks like an overgrown remote control car, one outfitted with a rocket boost system that allows you to reach incredible speeds and heights. You’ll start out by driving around on the ground, attempting to crash and bash your way through your opponents in order to score a goal. After a while though you’ll start to get a little trickier, flying through the air to intercept the ball and bringing it crashing back down to earth with incredible speed. Of course no multiplayer game is complete without a treasure trove of cosmetics behind it, allowing you to customize the look of your little racer however you see fit. For the ultra-competitive amongst us there’s ranked matchmaking and an inbuilt league system, allowing you to set up tournaments for your friends and foes alike. Taken as a whole it’s got the makings of a game with aspirations to be an eSports contender, although whether it will become one is up to the community at large.

All matches have a 5 minute timer on them meaning that, for the most part, a full game won’t take you much longer than that to complete. Of course if you or your opposing team is dominating you, and the entire team doesn’t skip the goal replays (which seems to happen all the time), it’ll take a lot longer than that as you watch every goal repeated for 30 seconds. Still it’s not the kind of game where you’ll start a game an hour before you have to do something and then find yourself running short on time. For the most part you’ll spend most of this fervently chasing the ball around the court, trying to pry it off your opponents and ramming everyone enthusiastically. You’ll get points (which are just used to determine who the MVP of the game is) for doing things like scoring and stopping goals which are a good way to encourage you to actually play properly rather than just playing like a ball obsessed puppy.

Rocket League Review Screenshot Wallpaper Match Winning Shot At the start the matches are chaotic and fun, with everyone racing around everywhere trying their best to wrangle their car to hit the ball in the right direction. However it didn’t take long for the matchmaking system to breakdown somewhat, often paring me with opponents who far exceeded my (and my team-mates’) own abilities. This is partially due to me being a little late to the party, coming into it almost 3 weeks after its initial release, however a good matchmaking system would ensure that, for any given match, we had a 50/50 chance of winning. So now, with the initial wave of players starting to dwindle, the people that are left behind are the ones who are more than a couple steps above rookies like myself. It’s a challenge that faces any multiplayer game that has aspirations of running for years past its original release date and unfortunately one that doesn’t have a great solution. Rocket League will still be a blast with friends, you can pick up the core mechanics in 10 minutes, but the online may end up being just as difficult to crack as other long term multiplayer games.

Whilst I didn’t get enough time on the PlayStation4 version to comment on how stable it is (although tales of PlayStation4s overheating while playing it don’t bode particularly well in my book) Rocket League on PC is stable during regular play. However I had numerous, inexplicable crashes to desktop that seemed to occur randomly during the game. Sometimes it was during the initial part of the game where I was revving my engine, others whilst a bunch of us crashed into each other. Looking through the Steam folder I can’t seem to locate any crash dumps or debug logs so I can’t comment as to what’s causing it but it’s definitely an issue that I’ve yet to see a resolution for.

Rocket League Review Screenshot Wallpaper Digital Matchbox racers

Rocket League demonstrates that sequels can outshine their predecessors as it took an idea that was met with lukewarm reception and turned it into the game everyone is talking about. The core game play is fun and frantic, made even better when you throw a few friends into the mix. The online multiplayer works well for the most part however newcomers might be greeted by a wall of players who are far more skilled than they are. Still that doesn’t detract from the fact that playing this game with a bunch of mates is tons of fun, something that will keep it alive for many years to come.

Rating: 8/10

Rocket League is available on PlayStation 4 and PC right now for $19.99 (currently free for PlayStationPlus subscribers). Game was played on both platforms with a combined playtime of approximately 3 hours with 31% of the achievements unlocked on the PC.

3 Decades of Existence.

Well it happened: I turned 30.

As someone who keeps company about a year older than himself it was interesting to see my friends’ reactions to hitting their third decade, most of them dreading it with all their being. I think the reason for this is that from that moment on you’re no longer in your twenties and, as such, are shouldered with the burden of expectations of being a mature adult. That’s not something my generation will typically accept gracefully although, honestly, I’d hazard a guess that no generation before has either. Regardless of how you feel about the date though it is a time to pause and reflect on the time you’ve had and the path laid out before you.

30 Before and After

I’ve enjoyed quite a lot of success in my life thanks to a combination of determination, support and a healthy dose of luck. If you had told me I’d be in this position 10 years ago I would’ve told you that was obvious (ah, the naivete of youth) but honestly I had tracked out a completely different path for myself then, confident that I had control over every single nuance of my life. That, of course, turned out to be impossible and instead I have made the best of the situation I’ve found myself in. Now instead of attempting to meticulously plan my life out 10 years ahead I instead find myself focusing on the here and now, taking every step I can towards my goals without constraining myself to a set timeframe.

Which brings me to the pertinent point of this post: the goal.

I had an informal, let’s call it a goal, with a mate of mine that we made back in college that we’d both make our first million by the time we were 30. It seemed like a pretty reasonable goal, we had about 12 years at the time to make it which averaged out to something like $83,000/year. He was already on the way to achieving that, having been peddling computer gear and other things through the then nascent eBay, but I was intent on making it by rocketing up the corporate ladder to find myself in a position to earn it directly. Interestingly enough we’ve both progressed our careers along those paths as he’s had several business ventures over the years whilst I’ve spent the majority of mine climbing the corporate structures of Canberra IT.

Now the juicy part: did either of us make it? I can’t speak for Vince (although he did say it changed month by month when I mentioned it in a blog post almost 5 years ago, gosh the time went fast) but for me the answer is a little complicated: yes if you’ll allow me a technicality and no if you won’t. The technicality lies within the capital that I have control over which is well over the threshold however I cannot strictly lay claim to that, the bank still holds an interest in that capital in the form of mortgages. If I was to realise everything I’d probably be closer to halfway to my first million rather than over it which many would argue is the more true figure. Suffice to say I err on the side of the technicality because whilst I might not have a bank balance that says $1 million I do make returns as if I have it and have used that capital as real money in the past.

In all honesty though that’s taken a back seat to my primary goal of just doing the things that I love the most. I made the move to Dell almost 2 years ago now and honestly couldn’t be happier as they’ve allowed me to do things that I never had the chance to before. I’ve literally travelled the world for my work and my blog, something that I had always dreamed of doing but never thought I’d realise. In the last 3 years I’ve played over 150 different games, greatly expanding my gaming world and revelling in the review process. I’ve married my college sweetheart and seen her pursue a career of her own passion which has made both her and myself incredibly happy. Money is all well and good but it’d be nothing without the amazing things that have happened despite it.

It’s strange to think that, even though I’ve been living for 30 years now, the vast majority of my life is still likely ahead of me. I may not be the crazy youth that I once was, the one who thought being the CEO of multi-national company was possible in a sub-10 year timeframe, but I still believe that great things lie ahead. Experience has taught me that those things won’t come my way on their own however and should I aspire to more I’ll have to bust my butt to make it there. It is satisfying to know that the only thing standing between me and my ultimate goals is effort and time rather than whatever nebulous concept I had in my head all those years ago.

Suffice to say 30 doesn’t feel like the doom and gloom it was made out to be 😉

Money Money Everywhere But Not A Cent To Spend.

I’m often asked about what’s the best way for people to invest their hard earned dollars so they can have their money work for them. I’d love to say I’ve coached people to make their fortunes out of the stock market or property investments but that’s just not the case. Typically I get as far as asking what their end goal is for investing and never hearing back from them. So today I want to give everyone some ideas and a bit of a framework so that you can go out into the wild blue yonder of investing and make proper decisions about what you want to achieve.

After many long night shifts working at one of my last jobs I ended up stumbling across a few good sources of investment information. The forums are filled with hundreds of people who are either looking to invest or are already well on their way to their financial goals. I spent many of the long 12pm to 7am drag reading through all the articles and asking all sorts of silly questions until I finally came to the conclusion that I needed to approach this just like any other project. The first step is to scope out your requirements.

So what’s the end goal for investing? For myself it’s to build up an asset base that will eventually replace my income and will also give me a lot of leverage so I can maximise my return. A lot of the time people tell me “I just want to be rich” but what that lacks is a real end point where you can call success. I’ve seen people often get too frustrated at not seeing any results early on and giving up on the investing game completely, that’s why it’s important to know your goals and set milestones so you can track your progress.

Let’s take a generic example that’s based off what I want to achieve:

  • Time frame: 5~10 years
  • Risk profile: low to medium.
  • Goal: passive income of approximately $150,000/year (in today’s dollars)
  • Chosen investment vehicle: property for asset base, managed funds or high yield shares for revenue

So the first thing you need to decide is how long you want to be in the game before you achieve your goal as this affects what investment vehicle you should choose. Property is a medium to long term with shares, managed funds, etc are more geared to short to medium term investments. However there’s exceptions with both these rules so you can make a quick buck with property (usually done through “flipping“) and there are many shares which mimic property trends (bank stocks are a good example of this).

Once you’ve decided your investment term the next thing to decide is how much risk you’re willing to take on. Risk is a complicated term especially when it comes to managed funds as it doesn’t mean exactly what most people think it means. For example, a lot of revenue geared managed funds (basically high interest savings accounts) classify risk as the potential for them not to make the targeted yield, whereas risk in direct share purchases is more aptly described as the potential for the stock to lose its value. A general rule of thumb is investments like shares and managed funds are medium to high risk with property being in the low risk area. Again there are exceptions to these rules (as we’ve seen recently) but you can usually guage risk by the return or yield the investment offers. The higher the return, the more likely it’s a risky investment.

Now for the juicy part, where do you want to be at the end of all this? Do you want to replace your income so you don’t have to work? Are you building a nest egg for retirement? Do you have your eye on a Bugatti Veyron and can’t get the finance with your current assets? This is the idea that will drive you through your investment and will be the base of your financial plan.

So for someone like me who is risk adverse, in it for the long game and is looking to leverage as much as he can property was the best investment for me. Once I’ve got my asset base up I’ll be shuffling money into managed funds or similar to get my revenue up, as property is a great leverage tool but not the best for revenue generation. Depending on your situation many of the other options out there might be the best thing for you. So, as always, have a look around at the vast options and use the 3 basic ideas I’ve described here and you’ll be well on your way to financial freedom.

This post does not constitute financial advice and is provided as is with no guarantees, warranties or support. Seek professional advice from a registered financial advisor before undertaking any investment decision.