Posts Tagged‘hypervisor’

VMware Targets OpenStack with vSphere 6.

Despite the massive inroads that other virtualization providers have made into the market VMware still stands out as the king of the enterprise space. Part of this is due to the maturity of their toolset which is able to accommodate a wide variety of guests and configurations but they’ve also got the largest catalogue of value adds which helps vastly in driving adoption of their hypervisor. Still the asking price for any of their products has become something of a sore point for many and their proprietary platform has caused consternation for those looking to leverage public cloud services. With their latest release of their vSphere product VMware is looking to remedy at least the latter issue, embracing OpenStack compatibility for one of their distributions.

vmware_vsphere

The list of improvements that are coming with this new release are numerous (and I won’t bother repeating them all here) but suffice to say that most of them were expected and  in-line with what we’ve gotten previously. Configuration maximums have gone up for pretty much every aspect, feature limitations have been extended and there’s a handful of new features that will enable vSphere based clusters to do things that were previously impossible. In my mind the key improvements that VMware have made in this release come down to Virtual SAN 6, Long Distance vMotion and, of course, their support for OpenStack via their VMware Integrated OpenStack release.

Virtual SAN always felt like a bit of an also-ran when it first came out due to the rather stringent requirements it had around its deployment. I remember investigating it as part of a deployment I was doing at the time, only to be horrified at the fact that I’d have to deploy a vSphere instance at every site that I wanted to use it at. The subsequent releases have shifted the product’s focus significantly and now presents a viable option for those looking to bring software defined datacenter principles to their environment. The improvements that come in 6 are most certainly cloud focused with things like Fault Domains and All Flash configurations. I’ll be very interested to see how the enterprise reacts to this offering, especially for greenfields deployments.

Long Distance vMotion might sound like a minor feature but as someone who’s worked in numerous large, disparate organisations the flexibility that this feature will bring is phenomenal. Right now the biggest issue most organisations face when maintaining two sites (typically for DR purposes) is the ability to get workloads between the sites, often requiring a lengthy outage process to do it. With Long Distance vMotion making both sites active and simply vMotioning workloads between sites is a vastly superior solution and provides many of the benefits of SRM without the required investment and configuration.

The coup here though is, of course, the OpenStack compatibility through VMware’s integrated distribution. OpenStack is notorious for being a right pain in the ass to get running properly, even if you already have staff that have had some experience with the product set in the past. VMware’s solution to this is to provide a pre-canned build which exposes all the resources in a VMware cloud through the OpenStack APIs for developers to utilize. Considering that OpenStack’s lack of good management tools has been, in my mind, one of the biggest challenges to its adoption this solution from VMware could be the kick in the pants it needs to see some healthy adoption rates.

It’s good to see VMware jumping on the hybrid cloud idea as the solution going forward as I’ve long been of the mind that that will be the solution going forward. Cloud infrastructure is great and all but there are often requirements it simply can’t meet due to its commodity nature. Going hybrid with OpenStack as the intermediary layer will allow enterprises to take advantage of these APIs whilst still leveraging their investment in core infrastructure, utilizing the cloud on an as-needed basis. Of course that’s the nirvana state but it seems to get closer to realisation with every new release so here’s hoping VMware will be the catalyst to finally see it succeed.

VMware’s Demise? More Like The Rise of Haggling.

In the eyes of corporate IT shops the word virtualization is synonymous with the VMware brand. The reason is this is simple, VMware was first to market with solutions that could actually deliver tangible results to the business. VMware then made the most of this first mover advantage quickly diversifying their product portfolio away from just straight up virtualization into a massive service catalogue that no competitor has yet to match. There’s no denying that they’re the most pricey of the solutions however but many IT shops have been willing to wear the costs due to the benefits that they receive. However in the past couple years or so the competitors, namely Hyper-V and Xen, have started to catch up in features and this has seen many IT shops questioning their heavy investment in VMware.

Undoubtedly this dissatisfaction with VMware’s products has been catalysed by the licensing change in vSphere 5 which definitely gave the small to medium section of the market some pause when it came to keeping VMware as a platform. For larger enterprises it wasn’t so much of a big deal since realistically they’d already licensed most of their capacity anyway. Still it’s been enough for most of them to cast a careful eye over their current spend levels on VMware’s products and seek to see if there’s perhaps a better way to spend all that cash. Indeed a recent survey commissioned by Veeam showed that 38% of virtualized businesses were looking to switch platforms in the near future.

The report doesn’t break down into exactly which platform they’re switching from and to but since the 3 biggest reasons cited are cost, alternative hypervisor features and licensing model (all long time complaints of the VMware platform) it’s a safe bet that most of those people are considering changing from VMware to another platform (typically Hyper-V). Indeed I can add that anecdotally the costs of VMware are enough now that business are seriously considering the platform swap because of the potential savings from a licensing perspective. Hyper-V is the main contender because most virtualization is done with Windows servers and under the typical licensing agreements the hypervisor is usually completely free. Indeed even the most basic of Windows server licenses gives you 1 free virtual machine to play with and it just gets better from there.

But why are so many considering switching from the market leader now when the problems cited have been around nearly half a decade? For the most part it has to do with the alternatives finally reaching feature parity with VMware when it comes to base level functionality. For the longest time VMware was the only one that was capable of doing live migrations between hosts with technology they called vMotion. Xen caught up quickly but their lack of Windows support meant that it saw limited use in corporate environments, even after the support was added in shortly after. Hyper-V on the other hand struggled to get it working only releasing it with Server 2008 R2. With Windows 2003 and XP now on the way out many IT shops are now looking to upgrade to 2008 R2 and that’s when they notice the capabilities of Hyper-V.

Strictly speaking though I’d say that whilst there’s a good few people considering making the jump from VMware to another hypervisor the majority are only doing so in order to get a better deal out of VMware. Like any business arrangement the difference between the retail price and the actual price anyone pays is quite large and VMware is no exception to this rule. I’ve seen quite a few decision makers wave the Hyper-V card without even the most rudimentary of understanding of what it’s capabilities are, nor any concrete plans to put it in motion. There’s also the fact that if you’re based on VMware now and you switch to another platform you’re going to have to make sure all your staff are retrained with the new product, a costly and time consuming exercise. So whilst the switch from VMware may look like the cheaper option if you just look at the licensing there’s a whole swath of hidden and intangible costs that need to be taken into consideration.

So with that all said is VMware staring down the barrel of a inevitable demise? I don’t believe so, their market capture and product lead means that they’ve got a solid advantage over everyone in the market. Should the other hypervisors begin eating away at their market share they have enough of a lead to be able to react in time, either by significantly reducing their prices or simply innovating their way ahead again. I will be interested to see how these figures shape up in say 3/9/12 months from now to see if those 38%ers made good on their pledge to change platforms but I’m pretty sure I know the outcome already.