Posts Tagged‘suit’

This Suit is From The Internet.

If I’m honest clothes shopping isn’t one of my favourite things to do. Whilst I’m somewhat lucky in that I’m not particularly hard to fit the whole process just seems to take too long and the recovering introvert in me doesn’t enjoy discussing my appearance with the store staff. Still I have something of a passion for suits ever since I discovered the difference between the cheap, polyester suits of my youth and the down right exquisiteness of the full wool suit I bought for my sister in-law’s wedding. However I’m still a financial conservative at heart and whilst I’d love nothing more than to drop a couple thousand on a bespoke suit tailored to perfection I’m quite happy with something cheaper if it’s of quality and fits relatively well.

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My previous work suit was a decently priced affair from yd, it’s only downside being that it used the cheaper blended fabric so as it aged it started to show rather obviously. The suit I had had before that was pure wool and only went to retirement due to the fact that I naively bought a single pair of pants for it and finding a matching pair (it was grey) proved notoriously difficult. So I figured it was time to invest in another wool suit, one that would hopefully last me for a couple years and, hopefully, wouldn’t break the bank. After searching around for a while I stumbled ASOS’ range of suits and was quite surprised at their prices.

For comparison the best you can usually do on a full wool suit in a store is going to be around $500~600, usually a little more if you’re going to invest in another pair of pants to go with it. Online you might be able to get away a little cheaper, SuitSupply goes down to about $450 with full tailoring, but getting below that usually means a trip to Vietnam, if you want something of decent quality. ASOS though had a full wool suit for about $270 as well as everything else you’d need to kit out a new work wardrobe. In the end I figured it was worth the risk and for about $470 I was able to get a suit, 2 pairs of pants and 4 shirts delivered to my door in about 5 days.

The results, as the above picture shows, speak for themselves.

First off the construction of their suits is top notch, at least on par with my store bought suits of years past. The fabric has a very subtle diagonal lining on it which makes it look a little more welcoming than a solid black fabric suit tends to. As for sizing their provided guide seems to be spot on as I ordered their long versions and they fit my rather tall frame well. The pants will probably need a bit of tailoring to take them up a bit but I much prefer that to the alternative. The suit jacket also feels like it will need a couple wears to settle in properly as the collar has a rather annoying tendency to flip itself up at the moment.

Probably my one major complaint will be in the variability of the shirts as I bought 4 of their Smart Shirts in the same size but they all fit differently. For instance the charcoal button down collar ones seem to fit perfectly in almost all regards (the sides might need to be taken in a bit) however the herringbone one has almost uncomfortably tight sleeves, especially when you bend your elbows. I had figured that since they were all pretty much the exact same design there wouldn’t be that much variability but unfortunately there is. I haven’t looked up other reviews to see if this is a widespread issue however so it might just be an isolated case.

For the price I have to say I’m quite stunned as whilst I was expecting something that was serviceable I wasn’t expecting something that would exceed the quality of what I can source here locally. There are a few quirks here and there of course however apart from getting something fully tailored this is something that should be expected. It doesn’t approach the quality of my good dinner suit however but the price of admission for that particular garment was almost double of this one. So if you’re looking for a daily suit then you really can’t go past ASOS, especially for the price.

Was That Really Necessary, Sony?

Whilst I might be an unapologetic Sony fan boy even I can’t hide from their rather troubled past when it comes to customer relations. Of course everyone will remember their latest security incident which saw millions of PSN accounts breached but they’ve also had other fun incidents involving auto-installing root kits as copy protection and suing people into silence. Of course every corporation has its share of misgivings but Sony seems to have somewhat of a habit of getting themselves into hot water on a semi-regular basis with their actions. This week brings us another chapter in the saga that is the people vs Sony corporation, but it’s not as bad as it first seems.

Last week saw Sony update their PSN agreement which happens with nearly every system update that the PlayStation 3 receives. However this time around there was a particular clause that wasn’t in there previously, specifically one that could prevent class action lawsuits:

Sony has been hit with a number of class-action lawsuits since the launch of the PlayStation 3, mostly due to the decision to retroactively remove Linux support from the console and losing the data of users due to questionable security practices. Sony has another solution to this problem beyond beefing up security (and it’s not retaining the features you paid for): if you accept the next mandatory system update, you sign away your ability to take part in a class-action lawsuit. The only option left for consumers if they agree is binding individual arbitration.

ANY DISPUTE RESOLUTION PROCEEDINGS, WHETHER IN ARBITRATION OR COURT, WILL BE CONDUCTED ONLY ON AN INDIVIDUAL BASIS AND NOT IN A CLASS OR REPRESENTATIVE ACTION OR AS A NAMED OR UNNAMED MEMBER IN A CLASS, CONSOLIDATED, REPRESENTATIVE OR PRIVATE ATTORNEY GENERAL LEGAL ACTION, UNLESS BOTH YOU AND THE SONY ENTITY WITH WHICH YOU HAVE A DISPUTE SPECIFICALLY AGREE TO DO SO IN WRITING FOLLOWING INITIATION OF THE ARBITRATION. THIS PROVISION DOES NOT PRECLUDE YOUR PARTICIPATION AS A MEMBER IN A CLASS ACTION FILED ON OR BEFORE AUGUST 20, 2011.

Accompanying that particular section is a clause that allows you to opt out of this particular section of the agreement but you have to send a snail mail letter to what I assume to be Sony’s legal department in Los Angeles. On the surface this appears to rule out any further class action suits that Sony might face in the future, at least in the majority of cases where people simply click through without reading the fine print. Digging through a couple articles (and one insightful Hacker News poster) on it however I don’t think that this is all it’s cracked up to be, in fact it might have been wholly unnecessary for Sony to do it in the first place.

The clause explicitly excludes small claims which can be up to thousands of dollars. Now I’ve never been involved in any class action suits myself but the ones I’ve watched unfold online usually end up with all affected parties receiving extremely small pay offs, on the order of tens or hundreds of dollars. If you take Sony hacking case as an example a typical out of pocket expenditure for a victim of identity theft is approximately $422 (in 2006), much lower than the threshold for small claims. Considering that Sony already provided identity fraud insurance for everyone affected by the PSN hack it seems like a moot point anyway.

Indeed the arbitration clause seems to be neither here or there for Sony either with the new clause binding both parties to the arbitrator’s decision, rendering them unable to contest it in a higher court. The arbitration can also occur anywhere in the USA so that people won’t have to travel to Sony in order to have their case heard. The clause also doesn’t affect residents of Europe or Australia further limiting its reach. All in all it seems like it tackles a very narrow band of potential cases, enough so that it barely seems necessary for Sony to even put it in.

Honestly I feel that it’s more that given their track record Sony has to be extremely careful with anything they do that could be construed as being against their consumers. The arbitration clause, whilst looking a lot like a storm in a teacup, just adds fuel to the ever burning flamewar that revolves around Sony being out to screw everyone over. Hopefully they take this as a cue to rework their PR strategies so that these kind of incidents can be avoided in the future as I don’t think their public image can take many more beatings like this.