Windows Azure

Azure Tables: Watch Out For Closed Connections.

Windows Azure Tables are one of those newfangled NoSQL type databases that excels in storing giant swaths of structured data. For what they are they’re quite good as you can store very large amounts of data in there without having to pay through the nose like you would for a traditional SQL server or an Azure instance of SQL. However that advantage comes at a cost: querying the data on anything but the partition key (think of it as a partition of the data within a table) and the row key (the unique identifier within that partition) results in queries that take quite a while to run, especially when compared to its SQL counter parts. There are ways to get around this however no matter how well you structure your data eventually you’ll run up against this limitation and that’s where things start to get interesting.

By default whenever you do a large query against an Azure Table you’ll only get back 1000 records, even if the query will return more. However if your query did have more results than that you’ll be able to access them via a continuation token that you can add to your original query, telling Azure that you want the records past that point. For those of us coding on the native .NET platform we get the lovely benefit of having all of this handled for us directly by simply adding .AsTableServiceQuery() to the end of our LINQ statements (if that’s what you’re using) which will handle the continuation tokens for us. For most applications this is great as it means you don’t have to fiddle around with the rather annoying way of extracting those tokens out of the response headers.

Of course that leads you down the somewhat lazy path of not thinking about the kinds of queries you’re running against your Tables and this can lead to problems down the line. Since Azure is a shared service there are upper limits on how long queries can run and how much data they can return to you. These limits aren’t exactly set in stone and depending on how busy the particular server you’re querying is or the current network utilization at the time your query could either take an incredibly long time to return or could simply end up getting closed off. Anyone who’s developed for Azure in the past will know that this is pretty common, even for the more robust things like Azure SQL, but there’s one thing that I’ve noticed over the past couple weeks that I haven’t seen mentioned anywhere else.

As the above paragraphs might indicate I have a lot of queries that try and grab big chunks of data from Azure Tables and have, of course, coded in RetryPolicies so they’ll keep at it if they should fail. There’s one thing that all the policies in the world won’t protect you from however and that’s connections that are forcibly closed. I’ve had quite a few of these recently and I noticed that they appear to come in waves, rippling through all my threads causing unhandled exceptions and forcing them to restart themselves. I’ve done my best to optimize the queries since then and the errors have mostly subsided but it appears that should one long running query trigger Azure to force the connection closed all connections from that instance to the same Table storage will also be closed.

Depending on how your application is coded this might not be an issue however for mine, where the worker role has about 8 concurrent threads running at any one time all attempting to access the same Table Storage account, it means one long running query that gets terminated triggers a cascade of failures across the rest of threads. For the most part this was avoided by querying directly on row and partition keys however the larger queries had to be broken up using the continuation tokens and then the results concatenated in memory. This introduces another limit on particular queries (as storing large lists in memory isn’t particularly great) which you’ll have to architect your code around. It’s by no means an unsolvable problem however it was one that has forced me to rethink certain parts of my application which will probably need to be on Azure SQL rather than Azure Tables.

Like any cloud platform Azure is a great service which requires you to understand what its various services are good for and what they’re not. I initially set out to use Azure Tables for everything and have since found that it’s simply not appropriate for that, especially if you need to query on parameters that aren’t the row or partition keys. If you have connections being closed on you inexplicably be sure to check for any potentially long running queries on the same role as this post can attest they could very well be the source of what ales you.

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