Posts Tagged‘ycombinator’

MYO Band

MYO Is The Missing Interface for Augmented Reality Devices.

We’re on the cusp of a new technological era thanks in no small part to the ubiquity of smart phones. They’ve already begun to augment us in ways we didn’t expect, usurp industries that failed to adapt and have created a fledgling industry that’s already worth billions of dollars. The really interesting part, for me at least, is the breaking down of the barriers between us and said technology as whilst it’s all well and good that we can tap, swipe and type our way through things it does feel like there should be a better solution. Whilst we’re still a ways off from being able to control things with our brains (although there’s a lot of promising research in this direction) there’s a new product available that I think is going to be the bridge between our current interface standards and that of more direct control methods.

MYO Band

Shown above is a product called the MYO from Thalmic Labs, a Y-Combinator backed company that’s just started taking pre-orders for it. The concept for the device is simple: once you slip this band over your arm it can track the electrical activity in your muscles which it can then send back to another device via BlueTooth. This allows it to track all sorts of gestures and since it doesn’t rely on a camera it’ll work in far more situations than other devices that do. It’s also incredibly sensitive being able to pick up movement right down to your fingers, something which I wasn’t sure would be possible based on other similar prototype devices I had seen in the past. Needless to say I was very intrigued when I saw it as I instantly saw it as a perfect companion to Google’s Glass.

All the demonstration videos for Google Glass shows it being commanded by a pretty powerful voice interface with some functions (like basic menu navigation) handled through eye tracking. As a technology demo its pretty impressive but I’m not the biggest fan of voice interfaces, especially if I’m in a public space. I then started thinking about alternative input methods and whilst something like a laser keyboard works in certain situations I wanted something that would be as discreet as typing on a smartphone but was also a bit more elegant than carting around that (admittedly small) device.  The MYO could provide the answer to this.

Now the great thing about the MYO is that they’re opening it up to developers from the get go, allowing people like me to create all sorts of interesting applications for the device. For me there’s really only a single killer application required to justify the entry cost: a simple virtual keyboard that uses your muscles. I’ve read about similar things being in development for a while now but nothing seems to have made it past the high concept stage. MYO on the other hand has the real potential to bring this to fruition within the next year or two and whilst I probably won’t have the required augmented reality device to take advantage of it I’ll probably end up with one of these devices anyway, just for experimentation.

With this missing piece of the puzzle I feel like Glass has gone from being a technical curiosity to a device that I could see myself using routinely. The 1.0 MYO might be a little cumbersome to keep around but I’m sure further iterations of it will make it nigh on unnoticeable. This is just my narrow view of the technology as well and I’m sure there’s going to be hundreds of other applications where a MYO device will unlock some seriously awesome potential. I’m very excited about this and can’t wait to get my hands on one of them.

 

 

Absence Makes The Heart Grow Fonder (or Not).

My time spent developing my passion project hasn’t been continuous since the time I first started working on it. The first iteration lasted about a month and was a mad rush to cobble something together to mark the momentous “milestone” of 100 blog posts. I then spent the next couple months experimenting with Silverlight managing to replicate and extend the base feature set out to a point where I felt I was making progress. I then went on a 6 week hiatus from developing Geon to work on The Plan which, whilst making me a decent sized profit, never turned out to be the ticket to freedom I had hoped it would be. After taking a month off after that and coming back to look at Geon I couldn’t help but think that I was going about things in all the wrong ways, and came up with a completely new design.

This, I’ve found, is a common trend for me. Unless I continually work on a project I’ll always end up questioning the idea until I end up wondering what the point of doing it in the first place was. Initially this was quite good as whilst the first few iterations of Geon showed solid progress they were in all honesty horrid applications. However it was devastating for overall progress as the paradigm shifts I underwent during these times of developmental absence meant that the new vision was wholly incompatible with the old and I could see no way other than starting anew to get them back in line again. This is why the first2 iterations didn’t have any form of user logins and the third was such a horrible process that I don’t blame anyone for signing up for it.

I had thought that short breaks were immune to this idea as I had often taken a weekend or two off when a family event called or I was starting to feel burned out. However I hadn’t had the chance to do much work on Lobaco over the past 2 weeks thanks to me being otherwise occupied and those little tendrils of other worldly perspective started to creep in. Maybe it was the booze fueled weekend where I had a list of 5 other potentially marketable ideas or maybe it was just me pining for another break but suddenly I felt like there was so many other things I should be doing than pursuing my almost 2 year old idea. I let myself think that I could take part of the weekend off to work on one of those ideas but for some reason I just kept working on Lobaco.

I’m not sure if it was my persistence or hitting the submit on my application to Y-Combinator that did it but instead of pursuing those ideas that had tempted me all week long I just fired up Xcode and started plugging away. Whilst not my most productive weekend ever I did manage to tick off 2 more features for the iPhone client, leaving about 3 to go before my deadline of the end of March. I think the combination of a solid code base (that has all those rudimentary things done so I don’t have to spend time researching them) and almost half a year of iOS development under my belt is enough to keep the momentum going, making sure I don’t give up on this version until it reaches 1.0.

I used to think that time away from coding was just as valuable as time spent in code but that doesn’t seem to be holding as true as it used to be. Sure my first breaks led to radical changes in my vision for the end product (and is responsible for the Lobaco that exists today) but once you hit that sweet spot time away can be quite destructive, especially if you’re as prone as I am to distraction by new ideas. Thankfully the last 6 months of momentum aren’t lost on me and 2 weeks away wasn’t enough to distract me from my end goal. It would have been to easy to start procrastinating again without realizing it.