Monthly Archives: November 2019

Destiny 2: Shadowkeep: The Nightmare of the Grind.

Destiny 2 has remained unplayed since I finished my review of the Black Armory DLC, the mini-content drops not being anywhere near enough to tempt me back to the fold. When I started hearing rumours of Shadowkeep though I was hopeful for another injection of content like Forsaken; something to shake up the formula a bit and provide enough incentive for me to invest some solid hours back into Destiny again. The reality isn’t quite like that even though, given that I haven’t played for almost a year at this point, the number of changes to Destiny 2 in the interim are on par with those that Forsaken none of them are really focused on a player like me. Couple that with Shadowkeep being a new breed of expansion that’s not dependent on previous releases, set on a previous location from Destiny 1, you’re left with this weird mix of new and old. To be sure it’s far better than the mini-DLC drops that come with the various season passes but it’s lacking that same X-factor that really sucked me deep in with Forsaken.

Eris Morn has ventured deep into the caverns of the moon, seeking out a strange energy signal that’s been scratching away at the edge of her mind for some time. The Hive have also reawakened on the moon, having been dormant ever since the guardians slew Crota which brought the wrath of Oryx to our solar system. It’s down here that you discover the Pyramid, a relic of the time when the darkness was encroaching on our world, only to be pushed back at the last moment by the Traveler when it forged the guardians. Now horrendous nightmares of all sorts roam freely across the solar system, tormenting everyone with visions of close ones who’ve passed and bringing back shadows of fallen enemies. It is time once again Guardian to venture into the unknown and face the purest form of the darkness you’ve yet encountered.

Shadowkeep doesn’t bring with it any visual upgrades per se, however it does take the old Moon world and revamp it significantly. The same areas that I spent countless hours farming Helium Coils in are now far better rendered than I ever remembered them being before. That’s likely due in no small part to me playing it through a not-so-great capture card from my PS4 but still, the difference is night and day. The game still runs incredibly well, even with the newer encounters that throw insane numbers of enemies at you. After coming off The Surge 2 I had the terrible thought that my rig wasn’t really up to graphics like this anymore but thankfully I was mistaken.

If you’re like me and only just coming back to Destiny after some time then there’s going to be a slew of changes thrown at you, a lot of which are utterly meaningless in the grand scheme of things. The numerous events that have happened between then and now are still around such as Gambit Prime, the Vex Invasions, the Forges and a bunch of other things that I’m probably forgetting. The UI changes are definitely for the better, even if my muscle memory of where things used to be is now useless making some interactions an exercise in frustration. The light cap is now theoretically unlimited due to the introduction of an “artefact” item which everyone gets, adding to your power level as you gain XP. However the main caps are 950 for most gear and then 960 for “pinnacle” level loot which is essentially supposed to be a grind for those players who really need something to do. However given the fact I’ve seen numerous 960+ characters already shows that it’s not really that bad if you’re committed to it but the grind for us single character, not a lot of time to spare guys is going to be a lot tougher unfortunately.

There’s no changes to the underlying combat, that’s as great as it has ever been, but the stat and mod system has been reworked substantially. Now we’re very much into RPG territory as there’s a bunch of stats to min/max, mods to use in varying combinations and encounters that will demand you run certain builds in order to progress. This is something that the hardcore Destiny community has been requesting for sometime and so I don’t really begrudge Bungie for putting it in. For us plebs (and according to Wasted on Destiny at least half of you have played less than me) it does mean that part of the game is locked away from you behind a, thankfully somewhat easier, grind. Now I haven’t been playing since release, I think I’m into about week 3 or so, but I’m only up to light level 920ish with 20 hours in. My gut feel is it’s couple more weeks before I can get capped so I can raid. Whilst that’s not completely out of line with Forsaken what’s missing is that hook to keep me coming back. Forsaken had the ever evolving Dreaming City which was the perfect way to keep on motivating you to come back. Shadowkeep though? There’s really not much there, despite the massive reveal of the Pyramid.

To be sure there’s no end of stuff to do in there, hell I can easily lose a couple hours chasing down a couple powerful pieces of loot, but I’m not the kind of player where Destiny is my only game. If I had my way I’d definitely favour the older style system where getting raid ready didn’t take too long, a couple weeks of dedicate play for a single character solo player like myself, and then the optimisation for the raid would begin as you slowly amassed gear from it and honed your skills on the encounters. I know I’m likely in the minority of wanting something like that but if the grind isn’t going to provide me some level of satisfaction, either through meaningful progress or tidbits of lore and story, then I don’t have much else to drive me through it.

I’d probably be a little less pissy about it if the Pyramid wasn’t such a giant lore cock tease. For the uninitiated there’s been concept art of The Darkness floating around ever since the original Destiny and, you guessed it, it’s all about pyramids. To be sure there’s definitely something bigger brewing that’ll likely be revealed in this season’s DLC but I feel like this was a missed opportunity to use a massive reveal like that to create another Dreaming City like experience. Gargh, maybe I’m overthinking this.

Destiny 2: Shadowkeep is a kind of middle of the road expansion/DLC, not being a small content drop like Black Armory but still being nowhere near as big as Forsaken was. For those players who’ve been with Destiny 2 throughout the last year it’s likely the content injection they’ve been craving, a new set of goals for them to throw themselves against. For player like me though it’s probably too much and not enough all at the same time; the numerous little events that have occurred in the past year thrown at you all at once whilst the new shiny thing sort of blurs into the mix. Personally I’m a little disappointed in myself for setting my expectations so high but also at Destiny for not doing enough to meet them, even halfway. To be sure I’d prefer this kind of expansion over mini-DLCs any day of the week but I’d also rather spend a good chunk of change on a Forsaken like experience every year, if I was able.

Rating: 8.25/10

Destiny 2: Shadowkeep is available on PC, XboxOne and PlayStation 4 right now for $54.95. Total play time in Shadowkeep was 20 hours putting the total time in Destiny 2 at approximately 191 hours.

A Short Hike: Reception at Hawk’s Peak.

It’s that time of year again when the big name publishers start dumping title after title on us in an unrelenting wave until the end of the year. In the past this just meant I had a good amount of review fodder available, able to dump a good number of hours into each game as they came out. Now though? Not so much and so I still find myself on the hunt for short, typically indie titles to bridge the one game per week routine whilst I whittle away at 1 or 2 of the big name titles. This week’s title is A Short Hike, a title that came to me via the new discovery engine and is an interesting blend of exploration mechanics with light story elements that make for a wonderful casual experience.

You’ve gone to visit your aunt at Hawk Peak Provincial Park and, like any good remote location, there’s no cell reception at her hut. You’ve been expecting a call from someone though and so, on the advice of your aunt, you start the trek up to Hawk’s Peak summit. Along the way though you’ll meet a lot of interesting characters, all of whom have come to the park for varying reasons. Of course you can’t simply just climb to the top, no in order to make it to the very top you’ll need to complete a series challenges, often with the help of others. You also don’t need to rush to the top either as there’s plenty more to the park than just it’s summit.

A Short Hike has a unique visual style that’s reminiscent of isometric games of yesteryear. It’s deliberately down-res’d with the number of pixels on screen being artificially capped at around 640 x 480 and then upscaled to your screen’s resolution. This means that on the surface it very much has this retro feel to it but there’s also this undercurrent of other things that give away it’s modern underpinnings. Initially I was a little annoyed with it, the low resolution initially making it a little confusing visually, but it didn’t take long before I got used to it and then it’s really quite enjoyable. The visuals are also backed up by a great soundtrack which is only let down a little by the stock foley work. Still in terms of general craftsmanship A Short Hike is definitely up there in terms of quality.

Whilst the main goal of A Short Hike is to reach the summit really the main aim of the game is to just explore the park. The main mechanic is the golden feathers, a mechanic inspired by the stamina wheel in Breath of the Wild. Each feather allows you to do a mid air jump, run longer distances and climb any surface for a limited period of time. The game is designed in such a way that most places are accessible with a minimal amount of feathers and so the additional ones usually open up shortcuts that weren’t available to you before. Once you’ve got 6 or so you’ve basically got access to the entire island, including the summit, although I admit that having a few more does make it a lot easier to reach the summit as that final stretch doesn’t leave much wiggle room for mistakes. As you climb up you’ll encounter a bunch of NPCs, most of whom will have a quest for you or a small amount of flavour dialogue. This simplicity makes it easy to get into and enjoy the act of exploration.

Your view of the park is constrained a little bit more than what I’d like but this does make the world feel a lot larger than it really is. Initially this does make it a little hard to figure out exactly where you are in the world, especially considering that the camera is on rails and can sometimes whip around in an ungodly fashion that’s sure to disorient anyone. Still despite these two shortcomings it’s still very enjoyable to make your way around the park, getting familiar with all the locations and figuring out how best to make your way around. Once you’ve got a few feathers under your belt the island really starts to open up and it doesn’t take much to get anywhere. It’s at that point you’ll likely make for the summit which then gives you a really good opportunity to see more of the world.

The story is very light on, told through little scraps of dialogue between you and other characters in the game. There’s no real depth to many of the interactions, with them either being setups for quests or just commenting on the park itself, but there’s enough in there to give you the feeling that this is a well loved place. The small parts of the main storyline are pretty heartwarming too which just adds to the overall nice feeling that A Short Hike has.

A Short Hike is a wholesome exploration adventure, one that doesn’t ask much of the player but delivers a lot in return. The crudely rendered but artfully developed world is a lot of fun to explore and with the narrative kept light and brief there’s not much to distract you from doing just that. There’s a few small drawbacks, namely the constrained view and camera that could be a little better done, but overall the game and the world within it is realised well. If you’re suffering from epicness fatigue from all the AAA titles coming out of late then maybe it’s worth taking the time for A Short Hike.

Rating: 9.0/10

A Short Hike is available on PC right now for $11.50. Total play time was 76 minutes with 37% of the achievements unlocked.