Posts Tagged‘cooking’

Chef Watson: Big Data Might Finally be Usable.

The promise of Big Data has been courting many a CIO for years now, the allure being that all the data they have on everything can be fed into some giant engine that will then spit out insights for them. However like all things the promise and the reality are vastly different beasts and whilst there are examples of Big Data providing never before seen insights it hasn’t really revolutionized industries in the way other technologies have. A big part of that is that Big Data tools aren’t push button solutions, requiring a deep understanding of data science in order to garner the insights you seek. IBM’s Watson however is a much more general purpose engine, one that I believe could potentially deliver on the promises that its other Big Data compatriots have made.

IBM-2-of-4

The problem I see with most Big Data solutions is that they’re not generalizable, I.E. a solution that’s developed for a specific data set (say a logistics company wanting to know how long it takes a package to get from one place to another) will likely not be applicable anywhere else. This means whilst you have the infrastructure and capability to generate insights the investment required to attain them needs to be reapplied every time you want to look at the data in a different way or if you have other data that requires similar insights to be derived from it. Watson on the other hand falls more into the category of a general purpose data engine that can ingest all sorts of data and provide meaningful insights, even to things you wouldn’t expect like helping to author a cookbook.

The story behind how that came about is particularly interesting as it showed what I feel is the power of Big Data without the required need to have a data science degree to exploit it. Essentially Watson was fed with over 9000 (ha!) recipes from Bon Appétit‘s database which was then supplemented with the knowledge it has around flavour profiles. It then used all this information to derive new combinations that you wouldn’t typically think of and then provided them back to the chefs to prepare. Compared to traditional recipes the ingredient lists that Watson provided were much longer and involved however the results (which should be mostly attributed to the chefs preparing them) were well received showing that Watson did provide insight that would otherwise have been missed.

That’d just be an impressive demonstration of data science if it wasn’t for the fact that Watson is now being used to provide similar levels of insight across a vast number of industries from medical to online shopping to even matching remote workers with employers seeking their skills. Whilst it’s far short of what most people would class as a general AI (it’s more akin to a highly flexible expert system on the data it’s provided)  Watson has shown that it can be fed a wide variety of data sets and can then be queried in a relatively straightforward way. It’s that last part that I believe is the secret sauce to making Big Data usable and it could be the next big thing for IBM.

Whether or not they can capitalize on that though is what will determine if Watson becomes the one Big Data platform to rule them all or simply an interesting footnote in the history of expert systems. Watson has already proven its capabilities numerous times over so fundamentally it’s ready to go and the responsibility now resides with IBM to make sure it gets in the right hands to further develop it. Watson’s presence is growing slowly but I’m sure a killer app isn’t too far off for it.