Posts Tagged‘mac’

Tim Cook Says Macs, iPads Won’t Converge.

Long time readers will know that I’ve long held the belief that OSX and iOS were bound to merge at some point in the future. For me the reasons for thinking this are wide and varied, but it is most easily seen in ever vanishing delineation between the two hardware lines that support them. The iPad Pro was the last volley that iOS launched against its OSX brethren and, for me, was the concrete proof that Apple was looking to merge the two product lines once and for all. Some recent off-hand remarks from CEO Tim Cook convinced many of my line of thinking, enough so that Tim Cook has come out saying that Apple won’t be developing a converged Mac/iPad device.

ipad pro

That statement probably shouldn’t come as much of surprise given that Cook called the Surface Book “deluded” just under a week ago. Whilst I can understand that it’s every CEO’s right to have a dig at the competition the commentary from Cook does seem a little naive in this regard. The Surface has shown that there’s a market for a tablet-first laptop hybrid and there’s every reason to expect a laptop first tablet hybrid will meet similar success. Indeed the initial reactions to the Surface Book are overwhelmingly positive so Cook might want to reconsider the rhetoric he’s using on this, especially if they ever start eyeing off creating a competing device like they did with the iPad Pro.

The response about non-convergence though is an interesting one. Indeed, as Windows 8 showed, spanning a platform between all types of devices can lead to a whole raft of compromises that leaves nobody happy. However Microsoft has shown that it can be done right with Windows 10 and the Surface Book is their chief demonstrator of how a converged system can work. By distancing himself from the idea that the platforms will never meet in the middle, apart from the handful of integration services that work across both platforms, Cook limits the potential synergy that can be gained from such integration.

At the same time I get the feeling that the response might have be born out of the concern he stirred up with his previous comment about not needing a PC any more. He later clarified that as not needing a PC that’s not a Mac since they are apparently not Personal Computers. For fans of the Mac platform this felt like a clear signal that Apple feels PCs are an also ran, something that they keep going in order to endear brand loyalty more than anything else. When you look at the size of the entire Mac business compared to the rest of Apple it certainly looks that way with it making less than 10% of the company’s earnings. For those who use OSX as their platform for creation the consternation about it going away is a real concern.

As you can probably tell I don’t entirely believe Tim Cook’s comments on this matter. Whilst no company would want to take an axe to a solid revenue stream like the Mac platform the constant blurring of the lines between the OSX and iOS based product lines makes the future for them seem inevitable. It might not come as a big bang with the two wed in an unholy codebase marriage but over time I feel the lines between what differentiates either product line will be so blurred as to be meaningless. Indeed if the success of Microsoft’s Surface line is anything to go by Apple may have their hand forced in this regard, something that few would have ever expected to see happen to a market leader like Apple.

MirrorMoon EP: For All The Worlds Left Uncovered.

I’ve often wondered what the world of experimental indie games looks like to someone who doesn’t have a long history with games. Whilst the average age of a gamer is pushing past 35 there’s still got to be a good chunk of people who didn’t grow up in the golden age of gaming which means that many of the conventions relied upon in these games would simply be unfamiliar to them. Usually this is done in aid of getting out of the way of the user’s experience (tutorials are by far the worst immersion breakers, bulldozing through the 4th wall) and it’s something I appreciate  although I recognise how this might be of limited appeal to others.  MirrorMoon EP is one such game, relying on your sense of curiosity and exploration to uncover the vast world that it encompasses.

MirrorMoon EP Screenshot Wallpaper Title Screen

I am slowly learning to travel in space.

Time is a meaningless variable that slips through my fingers.

Stopping requires a lot of energy while moving feels almost like staying still.

Breathing is hard inside this machine.

I need to stay calm.

And with only that to go on you’re dropped on a mysterious moon, one that has a strange relationship with another nearby celestial body.

MirrorMoon EP feels visually similar to other minimalistic exploration games like Kairo favouring texture-less environments with solid colours covering every surface. As I alluded to earlier I believe that this is done in order to focus you on the gameplay above everything else and indeed since the control mechanism doesn’t allow you to sight see particularly well (more on that later) it does feel like MirrorMoon EP is doing its best to get out of your way. As a fan of minimalism this works quite well for me, especially when I find myself agape at some of the scenery which is nothing more than a couple light shafts arranged in a particular manner.

MirrorMoon EP Screenshot Wallpaper Learning The Basics

MirrorMoon EP is an exploration puzzler and the first world you find yourself upon serves as an introduction into the numerous mechanics that are built into it. Your viewpoint is locked however so whilst you’re in first person mode you can’t look up or down, nor even to your left or right. Instead you have to move yourself around like your entire body is encased in concrete, fixing your vision firmly forward. This, coupled with the incredibly small sizes of the world, means that your sense of location and direction is severely limited however you’re able to unlock a large set of tools that will help you find your way around and some of them are quite novel.

As the name of MirrorMoon EP alludes to you’ll quickly find out that there’s another “moon” nearby that, once you’ve discovered the right tools, you’re able to interact with. Initially it doesnt’ make a whole lot of sense, the first one allows you to rotate it around to see different features, however it becomes apparent that the moon you’re manipulating is in fact a duplicate of your own. Then using the tools you have disovered by randomly bumbling about you can then use it to guide yourself, allowing you to unlock more and more secrets. Eventually you’ll solve the puzzle and be treated to some more vague on screen text but after that you’re given access to the real game and it’s quite something.

MirrorMoon EP Screenshot Wallpaper The MachineThis is your console for exploring the vast space that is contained within MirrorMoon EP. Like pretty much everything else in the game details on how it operates is scant but after clicking around you’ll eventually figure out what everything does. The screen with numerous dots all over it is a map of all the other moons you can visit and each of them contains an unique puzzle for you to solve which, once completed, will allow you access to a glowing orb. Should you be the first person to find that orb then you’re granted with a special privilege.

You get to name that moon.

Now with the massive number of planets available I get the feeling that they’re all procedurally generated so some of them are going to be amazing and others are going to be quite dull (I believe I visited one that was completely dark and the orb was right in front of you). The names are also persistent and you’ll be able to tell if someone’s named a planet by the name being something other than THX/89 or something of a similar format. I managed to haphazardly visit another person’s planet without realising it but soon after found myself seeking out all the planets I could in order to solve them before anyone else did.

MirrorMoon EP Screenshot Wallpaper Easy Planet

Whilst is a pretty novel and interesting mechanic it unfortunately gets boring quite quickly as whilst the planets are usually different in some way a lot of the time it’s just a jumble of various mechanics mashed together procedurally. Once you’ve seen a dozen or so planets you’ve likely seen them all and so what initially seems like something with infinite replay value quickly fades into repetition. I do like the idea though and for some people I’m sure this would be infinitely interesting (kind of like Kerbel Space Program in a way) but for me I just couldn’t be bothered after a while.

Now I’ll have to admit some fault here as whilst I managed to complete the first “side” easily (and got the achievement to that effect) I haven’t yet been able to figure out how to finish side B in order to get a complete understanding of the story. It does seem quite interesting, especially with the references to the “anomaly” and how the machine interacts with space and time, however the intentional vagueness of both the game and the story have curtailed my efforts to dig up any substantial meaning from it. I could just Google it, like I did for Kairo, and I probably will if I don’t find out anything more soon.

MirrorMoon EP Screenshot Wallpaper Strange Towers

MirrorMoon EP is an interesting game, one which is heavily shaped by your own experiences with it. The unapologetic, minimalistic nature of it will definitely be a turn off for some however the heavy focus on the game play to the exclusion of nearly everything else is something that MirrorMoon EP pulls off exceptionally. Unfortunately I feel like it’s replay value is somewhat limited due to its procedural nature and the intentional vagueness of both story and gameplay may have lead to me giving up on it prematurely. Still MirrorMoon EP stands out as yet another shining example of the indie exploration/puzzler genre and is definitely worth looking into.

Rating: 8.5/10

MirrorMoon EP is available on Steam and OUYA right now for $9.99. Total game time was around 2 hours with 40% of the achievements unlocked.

2013 Might Be Linux’s Year For Gaming.

The defacto platform of choice for any gamer used to be the Microsoft Windows based PC however the last decade has seen that change to be some form of console. Today, whilst we’re seeing something of a resurgence in the PC market thanks in part to some good releases this year and ageing console hardware, PCs are somewhere on the order take about 5% of the video game market. If we then extrapolate from there using the fact that only about 1~2% of the PC market is Linux (although this number could be higher if restricted to gamers) then you can see why many companies have ignored it for so long, it just doesn’t make financial sense to get into it. However there’s been a few recent announcements that shows there’s an increasing amount of attention being paid to this ultra-niche and that makes for some interesting speculation.

Linux Distros Tux

Gaming on Linux has always been an exercise in frustration, usually due to the Windows-centric nature of the gaming industry. Back in the day Linux suffered from a lack of good driver support for modern graphics cards and this made it nearly impossible to get games running on there at an acceptable level. Once that was sorted out (whether you count binary blobs as “sorted” is up to you) there was still the issue that most games were simply not coded for Linux leaving their users with very few options. Many chose to run their games through WINE or Cedega which actually works quite well, especially for popular titles, but many where still left wanting  for titles that would run natively. The Humble Indie Bundle has gone a long way to getting developers working on Linux but it’s still something of a poor cousin to the Windows Platform.

Late last year saw Valve open up beta access to Steam on Linux bringing with it some 50 odd titles to the platform. It came as little surprise that they did this considering that they did the same thing with OSX just over 2 years ago which was undoubtedly a success for them. I haven’t really heard much on it since then, mostly because none of my gamer friends run Linux, but there’s evidence to suggest that it’s going pretty well as Valve is making further bets on Linux. As it turns out their upcoming Steam Box will be running some form of Linux under the hood:

Valve’s engineer talked about their labs and that they want to change the “frustrating lack of innovation in the area of computer hardware”. He also mentioned a console launch in 2013 and that it will specifically use Linux and not Windows. Furthermore he said that Valve’s labs will reveal yet another new hardware in 2013, most likely rumored controllers and VR equipment but we can expect some new exciting stuff.

I’ll be honest and say that I really didn’t expect this even with all the bellyaching people have been doing about Windows 8. You see whilst being able to brag about 55 titles being on the platform already that’s only 2% of their current catalogue. You could argue that emulation is good enough now that all the titles could be made available through the use of WINE which is a possibility but Valve doesn’t offer that option with OSX currently so it’s unlikely to happen. Realistically unless the current developers have intentions to do a Linux release now the release of the Steam Box/Steam on Linux isn’t going to be enough to tempt them to do it, especially if they’ve already recovered their costs from PC sales.

That being said all it might take is one industry heavyweight to put their weight behind Linux to start a cascade of others doing the same. As it turns out Blizzard is doing just that with one of their titles slated for a Linux release some time this year. Blizzard has a long history with cross platform releases as they were one of the few companies to do releases for Mac OS decades ago and they’ve stated many times that they have a Linux World of Warcraft client that they’ve shied away from releasing due to support concerns. Releasing an official client for one of their games on Linux will be their way of verifying whether its worth it for them to continue doing so and should it prove successful it could be the shot in the arm that Linux needs to become a viable platform for games developers to target.

Does this mean that I’ll be switching over? Probably not as I’m a Microsoft guy at heart and I know my current platform too well to just drop it for something else (even though I do have a lot of experience with Linux). I’m very interested to see how the Steam Box is going to be positioned as it being Linux changes the idea I had in my head for it and makes Valve’s previous comments about them all the more intriguing. Whilst 2013 might not be a blockbuster year for Linux gaming it is shaping up to be the turning point where it starts to become viable.

Why Macs Aren’t (and Never Were) Virus/Malware/Spyware Free.

While I might enjoy a good old fashion Apple bashing more than I should I’m still pretty heavily invested in their platform, with me counting an iPhone and MacBook Pro amongst my computing arsenal. Still anyone who’s been reading this blog long enough will know that I’m no fan of the hype that surrounds their products nor the hoard of apologists who try to rework any product fault or missing feature as a symbol of Apple’s “vision” when realistically Apple should cop some flak for it. Today I want to tackle one of the longest standing Apple myths that has still managed to perpetrate itself even in light of the overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

I am talking about, as the title implies, Mac’s apparent immunity to malicious code.

Wind back the clock a few decades and we find ourselves in the dawn of the consumer PC age and with it the initial success of the Apple II series of microcomputers. Back then the notion of a computer virus was almost purely academic with all working viruses never leaving the confines of the places that they were created in. Rich Skrenta, a then 15 year old computer whiz, took it upon himself to code up what would become the very first virus to make it into the wild, he called it Elk Cloner. This particular virus would attach itself to the Apple DOS running on the Apple II and on every 50th boot would display a lovely little poem to the user. Whilst it didn’t cause any actual harm (apart from annoyance) it was able to spread to other floppy disks and was the first virus to overwrite the boot sector so that it would be loaded each time.

That’s right, the first ever in the wild virus was indeed Mac only.

Still there’s a little kernel of truth in the saying that Macs are resistant to malicious code. Whilst most viruses in the past were done to inflict chaos and harm upon their users the last decade saw virus writers make the switch to the more profitable adventures of stealing credit card information, mining data or turning your PC into a zombie to be used for nefarious purposes. Mac’s immunity then came from obscurity as there’s little reason to go to all that effort to only target a small percentage of the worldwide PC user base and so the most favored platform became the most targeted, leaving the Macs relatively untouched.

Still even a small percentage of billions still adds up to multiple millions of people and so some virus writers started to turn their sites towards the Mac platform. Reports started surfacing over the rumors that were circulating and it became official, Macs were now a target. Apologists shot of volleys left and right saying that these were just in a minority and were even doing so right up to the end of last year, stating that the Mac’s immunity remains intact. Today brings news however that not only have Macs made the mainstream for normal users, they’re now mainstream for virus creators:

The kit is being compared to the Zeus kit, which has been one of the more popular and pervasive crimeware kits for several years now. A report by CSIS, a Danish security firm, said that the OS X kit uses a template that’s quite similar to the Zeus construction and has the ability to steal forms from  Firefox.

“The Danish IT-security company CSIS Security Group has just yesterday observed a new advanced Form grabber designed for the Mac OS X operating system being advertised on several closed underground forums. In the same way as several other DIY crimeware kits designed for PCs, this tool consists of a builder, an admin panel and supports encryption,” Peter Kruse of CSIS said in a blog post.

Indeed they are now also the targets of scareware campaigns that masquerade themselves as actual virus scanners and with the prevalence of web based malware on the increase the Mac platform only provides immunity against the garden variety botnet software, not the fun stuff like man-in-the-middle attacks or cross site scripting vulnerabilities. Truly if you believe yourself immune to all the threats that the Internet poses simply because you chose the “better” platform you’re simply making yourself far more vulnerable to the inevitable, especially for things like social engineering.

I’m not sure why people continue to perpetuate the myth that Macs are completely immune to the threats of the Internet. It seems to stem from the deep rooted belief that Macs are the better platform (whether they are or not is left up to the reader) and quelling the rumors that Macs can be compromised would seem to strengthen it, somehow. Instead Mac users would be far better served by acknowledging the threats and then building countermeasures to stop them, just like the Windows platform has done before them. It’s not a bad thing, any platform that holds some kind of value will eventually become the target of nefarious forces, and the sooner Mac apologists wake up and admit that they’re not the shining beacons of security they think they are the better the worldwide computing system will be better for it.

Mac OS X: A Veteran Windows User’s Perspective.

I’ve been using the Windows line of operating systems for nigh on 2 decades now for my own personal PC and apart from the occasional tinkering I haven’t bothered trying anything else. My professional life is a different story as with VMware being a heavily modified version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux I’ve had to become more familiar with the open source alternative so that I can troubleshoot the more esoteric problems that it might throw at me. Additionally I had the (mis)fortune of managing one of Apple’s token stab at the enterprise market the Xserve which, whilst didn’t give me any large amount of grief, had its own way of doing things that made most trivial tasks take hours. That was probably the most experience I had had with an Apple OS up until I took my shiny new MacBook Pro (separate review coming soon) with me on my trip around America where I decided I would thoroughly test Mac OS X as my primary operating system.

The initial experience of starting up OS X for the first time is a world away from what I’m used to with Windows installs. You’re greeted with a short video presentation showing the various aspects of the OS which is then followed by the sign up process. I do remember it asking me for my iTunes account name and password during part of this which I thought was a no-no ever since Microsoft got into trouble for trying to get everyone to have a MSN account¹. Less than 5 minutes later I was ready to start bumbling my way through a new OS, and bumble I did.

My first initial task was to install Windows 7 on it since I know OS X wouldn’t be able to run everything I wanted it to. Getting bootcamp configured was pretty painless with the help of the guide Apple provides so there’s some big props for them there. About 20 minutes later I had a full Windows 7 installation running with all the drivers I needed, although I did update the video card with NVIDIA’s latest offerings. Satisfied that everything was fine on the Windows side I flipped back over to OS X to give it the initial shakedown.

First I tried browsing the web using the inbuilt browser, Safari. It opened up in a not-so-fullscreen manner so I hit what I thought was the maximise button to get it to fill the screen. It didn’t do anything and after researching around a bit I found that OS X doesn’t really have a concept of fullscreen and that button really only serves to switch between window sizes. I could get a close approximation to the maximise button by stretching everything out but that could also end up a window bigger than the screen it was on, especially with the lack of precision granted by the trackpad I was using.

Here is where I feel Apple is let down by its community. Whilst I’m not an easily offended person my searches for a solution to the fullscreen problem brought me to this forum thread in which it takes no less than a single post for a OS X user to abuse someone for trying to find a feature similar to Windows. I’d love to say that it was an isolated incident but time after time when I found myself looking for the answer to some problem I could easily solve in Windows this kind of elitism seems to follow quite closely. Granted I’m not saying all OS X users are like this but there’s enough of them to do a royal disservice to those of us who aren’t complete novices when it comes to computers but are unfamiliar with the world of OS X.

Undeterred from those experiences I went ahead and signed up for the Apple Developer Program and downloaded the latest version of Xcode. Installation was pretty easy and I was able to build a simple program about 10 minutes later with little hassles. Regular readers will know of the trials and tribulations I’ve been through since then but overall I’d count Xcode as a decent IDE but still needing some work to be up to the standard I’ve come to expect. Thankfully most of my questions regarding the IDE (such as deploying code to a real iPhone) were already answered in the online documentation which goes a long way to bridging the gaps.

Not long after using the laptop as a development machine I packed it up and took it with me on a trip around the USA and Canada. Here OS X started to show some of it’s convenience features that I really started to appreciate. The first was it opening up iPhoto when I plugged in my camera, where upon it began walking me through creating events and some of the other features it has. Unfortunately it didn’t like the way my camera stores movies (and iMovie doesn’t like the format) so they had to remain on the camera. Still it was nice to be able to load all the photos on the laptop at the end of the day and have them nicely arranged in a bunch of tiles.

The fun really started when I began trying to do things I had never attempted in another operating system before. Mostly this was troubleshooting things like why my camera wasn’t showing up (needed a reboot) or when I was trying to spoof my MAC address so that I didn’t have to pay the exorbitant price for the hotel Internet connection (why a $50/night place gives me Internet for free and a $400/night place doesn’t is beyond me). It seems in these areas of esoteric OS X issues and chicanery the community is much better than what I had initially encountered with me being able to Google up several solutions without any high and mighty Apple attitudes creeping in.

All the rudimentary programs (Finder, TextEditor, StickyNotes) function as expected and are pretty much identical to their counterparts on Windows. The same can be said for the system settings as once you click on it you’ve basically got a Windows control panel staring back at you. So whilst the visuals might be different the administration of OS X settings isn’t too far removed from what many of us long time Windowers are used to. Of course a bit of familiarity with the *nix terminal won’t go astray when you’re trying to do something really out of left field, but if you’ve used the command prompt or written a script in windows I don’t think you’d have too much trouble.

Overall I found OS X to be quite satisfactory as a desktop OS as it provided all the functionality I required of it whilst providing some value add that I wasn’t expecting. Still the experience wasn’t exactly mind blowing and there are many differences that are there just for differences sake (using the command key instead of control, close/minimise/maximise buttons on wrong side) that don’t do them any favours. I won’t be removing OS X completely as it works extremely well for what I use it for but I won’t be replacing Windows 7 as my current default OS. Would I recommend it for others? Hard to tell and it’s something that I’ll probably explore in a future post.

¹I did this set up over 2 months ago now so I might just be remembering this incorrectly but I did give up my iTunes account info well before I saw the desktop. It may not be required to use OS X but I wouldn’t have put it in unless I thought it was required.