Posts Tagged‘square enix’

The Turing Test: Are You Human?

It is rare to find games that manage to blend all of their components together into a cohesive whole. Even the most well resourced project will still suffer from the pains of integrating everything together, often leading to one or more parts just not feeling right. Games that do manage to do this however set the standard for those to come, showing that mechanics, story and sound can all be joined together to become greater than any one component. Such is The Turing Test, a near perfect combination of all its elements that makes for one of the most enthralling gaming experiences of this year.

You play as Eva, a pilot put into hibernation in orbit around Europa to act as a safe guard for the ground team on Earth. You are awoken to find out that your station AI, Tom, has lost contact with the ground team and needs you to re-establish contact with them. Upon landing you find that the entry to the base has been reconfigured in such a way that Tom cannot make his way past it alone. It is now up to you to make your way deep into the base to find out what happened to the crew and, hopefully, bring them back under the watchful eye of Tom.

The Turing Test does quite a lot with very little, the graphics erring towards visual simplicity more than anything else. It’s very reminiscent of Portal with all of the set pieces feeling like they were born out of the same design team. In puzzle based games like this such simplicity is definitely a plus, drawing your focus to the challenge at hand. The game definitely has that Unreal engine feel to it with its trademark visual flairs like its specularity mapping. It should come as no surprise then that The Turing Test ran flawlessly on my current rig and I’d suspect it’d run just fine on run of the mill hardware.

Mechanically The Turing Test is just your typical first person, physics based puzzler. Each room contains within it all the tools for you to progress through to the next challenge which is always just getting to the next room. The puzzles start off simple, requiring you to just find the right combination of what goes where, but quickly ramps up after that. In the end you’ll be facing timing puzzles, non-linear progressions and various other challenges that all seem impossible at first until you look at them from the right angle. The simple mechanics means it’s very quick to pick up and, honestly, not too hard to master either.

Now for some this might be seen as a downside as the satisfaction in puzzlers comes from the challenge in solving them. However in The Turing Test’s case the simple puzzles are part of the game’s overall rhythm. They’re designed to be solved at a certain rate, one that allows the story to progress at a steady rate. Indeed even with perfect knowledge of how to solve them I believe you’d still only just get through one puzzle before the dialogue dried up. Too often developers would include other time-wasting mechanics to extend the game’s play time but The Turing Test doesn’t. This means that both the story and game progress together, ensuring that the neither one gets in the way of the other.

This is then all brilliantly amplified by the sound track which ebbs and flows in sync with the game. Too often game soundtracks are overlooked, left as just something that needs to be there rather than an integral part of the game. Indeed for many of the recent games I’ve played I couldn’t really tell you if I enjoyed the sound track or not, it simply left no impression on me. The Turing Test however does a wonderful job of integrating the background music into the events happening in the game, amplifying all of the game’s pivotal moments.

The story itself, whilst not original nor inventive by any stretch of the imagination, is aptly paced and perfectly in sync with all of The Turing Test’s other elements. That is on the proviso though that you only play through the main areas and don’t go to the sides however. If you do unlock the secret rooms (which aren’t hard to find nor solve) the story has a very weird disconnection between what your character should know and what they appear to know. Whilst I’m sure there are some great theories as to why that could be due to the way the game’s world is set up that’s a conversation for another day.

Each of these elements, simple and concise in their own right, would only make for an average game if simply thrown together. The real beauty of The Turing Test is how well these are all worked together, the various elements integrated so well that they are much more than they are separately. Had this game been released in a world that was bereft of Portal or The Talos Principle it would be a shining star of inventive, thought provoking game play. Even in the shadow of those titles The Turing Test still stands out as an excellent piece of craftsmanship, one that should be lauded for aspiring for greatness that it easily achieves.

The only real niggle I’ll have at this otherwise exceptional game is that, due to the nature of its physically based puzzles, emergent game play can sometimes lead you astray. I’m quite sure there were several puzzles I solved in ways that wasn’t intended, mostly because I ended up at the exit door with more puzzle pieces than were required to solve it. Depending on how you swing though this might be part of the charm as I’m sure there’s numerous ways to break the puzzles. It should say a lot that that’s my only complaint about this otherwise fantastic game.

The Turing Test is a brilliant, well crafted example of what games can accomplish when all of their elements work with each other. Each element on its own is simple, from the visuals to the mechanics to the sound track, however together they form a cohesive whole that’s very much greater than the sum of its parts. The total game time doesn’t run long, maybe 3~5 hours depending on how much of a puzzle nut you are, but that entire time could be easily done in a single sitting. The Turing Test is one of those games that I will wholeheartedly recommend to any gamer as it really is worth the time.

Rating: 9.5/10

The Turing Test is available on PC and Xbox One right now for $19.99 on both platforms. Game was played on the PC with 3 hours of total playtime and 93% of the achievements unlocked.

Rise of the Tomb Raider: Trinity Rises.

Tomb Raider’s reboot of 3 years ago was a successful one, reinvigorating a franchise that had been sidelined by newer IPs in the same genre. Indeed it was the first Tomb Raider game I had played in many years as the bug ridden Underworld was simply unplayable. The reboot was enough to spark my interest in the IP again and since the sequel was announced about a year later I’ve been eagerly awaiting the next instalment. The (thankfully short) timed exclusivity to the XboxOne was a little annoying, since I had to dodge more reviews and articles than I usually do, but finally last week I spent a good chunk of time playing through the latest Tomb Raider.

Rise of the Tomb Raider Review Screenshot Wallpaper Title Screen

Rise of the Tomb Raider begins about a year after the events in the preceding instalment. Lara, after witnessing many supernatural occurrences on the island of Yamatai, seeks out answers in her father’s research notes. There she finds his white whale: the lost city of Kitezh which supposedly holds the key to immortality. Her quest sends her to Syria where she seeks out the lost tomb of an ancient prophet linked to the legend of Kitezh. It’s there however that she comes face to face with an organisation called Trinity: an ancient order dedicated to seeking out the supernatural and taking it for themselves. Lara is undeterred however and travels to Siberia where she believes the lost city of Kitezh resides.

The production values of Rise of the Tomb Raider are exceptionally high with every aspect of the game above the standard I’ve come to expect for AAA titles. Visually it is incredibly impressive with the environments being rich and detailed, ranging from wide open valleys to deep cave systems. There’s no one thing I can point to that really makes it so well crafted, more it’s the numerous small details like the trails you leave in snow or the way Lara’s gait changes after she’s had a fall. Unlike the previous instalment (which suffered from inflated expectations due to it following Crysis 3) Rise of the Tomb Raider felt impressive from the very start, a rare achievement in today’s torrent of AAA titles.

Rise of the Tomb Raider Review Screenshot Wallpaper Ruins in Syria

Rise of the Tomb Raider retains the same core game play that its predecessor did, being a combination of 3D platformer, 3rd person shooter and semi-open world exploration. The platforming functions pretty much the same as the last one did, giving you the same leeway when it comes to grabbing ledges or landing that jump perfectly. The 3rd person shooter mechanic functions largely the same although the upgrade system allows you to unlock some rather cool abilities that can change it dramatically. The semi-open world stylings mean that there’s much more to the world than just the campaign missions and, should you go exploring, you’re quite likely to be rewarded for your efforts. Overall it’s not a massive change from the previous Tomb Raider game and honestly, with the extra layer of polish this game has, I don’t think that’s a bad thing at all.

The puzzles and platforming sections are frequent but are, for the most part, easy enough to understand and complete without being too frustrating. In the beginning, with a limited number of mechanics at your disposal, it’s pretty easy to see how things need to be done. The difficulty starts to ramp up when you’ve got several other potential mechanics at hand, some of which aren’t explained as well as they could be. Still there was only one time when I find myself reaching for a walkthrough guide as all the other puzzles could be solved in a manageable amount of time. The platforming was a little less satisfying however as, whilst you have some leeway, it can be a little finicky about when it will pull you right or just let you fall to your death. Once you’ve worked out the quirks though (like not hitting jump if Lara is still shimmying across something) you can make up for those little quirks.

Rise of the Tomb Raider Review Screenshot Wallpaper Survival Instincts

Combat, again, feels largely the same with the game favouring head shots and thus any weapon that allows you to make them rapidly. The bow once again is the stand out weapon especially once you get the skill which does automatic head shots on up to 3 targets at once. Similar to its predecessor though there comes a time when the enemies start wearing helmets and you’ll have to land several consecutive head shots to take them down. This time around however it doesn’t feel as cheap as it did before as the increased number of stealth options provides much more opportunity to take out the heavy hitters before dealing with the rest of them. Overall the combat feels a little more streamlined with a little bit more variety on the side, should you wish to make use of it.

The skills, upgrades and crafting system is back with a few improvements to keep the pace of the game up. You can now craft arrows, other special ammo and healing on the fly if you have the required materials to do so. The mechanic of finding parts for major upgrades is still around and if you want those weapons you really will need to go exploring to complete them. The skills are interesting as early on I went for the additional XP traits something which meant that I was levelling up maybe every 20 minutes or so. Probably about halfway through the game I had all the skills I could ever want and so from there I was just unlocking things that were mildly interesting. It certainly helped to keep driving me forward as there was always a sense of progression but it did seem like I was maybe completing things a little faster than was probably intended.

Rise of the Tomb Raider Review Screenshot Wallpaper Geothermal Valley

Like its predecessor there are few rough edges on Rise of the Tomb Raider although none of them are particularly game breaking. You can quite easily glitch yourself through terrain if you roll, jump or sprint near say a set of stairs or similar. I had more than one occasion where I found myself stuck in between trees or falling forever when I jumped into a particularly cramped area. There’s also the aforementioned finicky-ness of the platforming system but once you know its limitations it’s a little easier to work around. Thankfully though many of the combat related issues are long gone although some of the enemies do seem to do wildly different amounts of damage during the same encounter.

Rise of the Tomb raider brings a much more developed and polished plot, one that dives further into the backstory of Lara and the Croft family. Thankfully the torture porn has been dialled back somewhat, instead focusing more on the trials and tribulations of Lara trying to come to grips with her father’s past and the impact it’s having on her current situation. The introduction of a big bad “thing” in the form of Trinity is a not-so-subtle hint there’s going to be several sequels to come but they at least function decently as an antagonist. Indeed they’ll likely be the focus point of the next instalment as they go after the next supernatural artefact that they’ll use to take over the world. The supernatural themes are better done this time around be less wrought and more subtly woven in the larger narrative. Indeed it seems that the writers behind this instalment in the Tomb Raider franchise have matured significantly since they wrote the last plot.

Rise of the Tomb Raider Review Screenshot Wallpaper Frantic Climb to the Top

Rise of the Tomb raider accomplishes what many sequels don’t: improving on their predecessor whilst still retaining the core aspects which made it great. The production value is extremely high with attention paid to every little detail. The game play is as solid as ever with several streamlining changes that keep the pace of the game up for its entire duration. It might not be the picture of perfection with a few rough edges still poking through but overall the experience is so well polished that it’s easy to write off those few moments. For both fans of the Tomb Raider IP and those who just love a good action game Rise of the Tomb Raider is well worth the asking price.

Rating: 9.25/10

Rise of the Tomb Raider is available on PC, XboxOne, Xbox360 and PlayStation4 right now for $59.99, $99.95, $79.95 and $79.95 respectively. Game was played on the PC with 12 hours of total play time and 22% of the achievements unlocked.

Murdered: Soul Suspect: It’s Never Easy Moving On.

Ever since I had my first taste of a story first game all those years ago I’ve been hooked on finding that same experience again in modern titles. Whilst Quantic Dream has always managed to deliver a solid experience in this regard newcomers to this field are very hit or miss, often not achieving what they set out to do. The struggle between just how much game makes it into the final product is what usually trips up most first time developers with the story suffering because of it (or vice versa). Murdered: Soul Suspect treads carefully enough to avoid some of these potential pitfalls whilst unfortunately falling prey to many others.

Murdered Soul Suspect Review Screenshot Wallpaper Title Screen

In the sleepy town of Salem, Massachusetts a murderer walks in the shadows. The killings seemingly have no relation to one another except for the victims always being young girls. The case  has become something of an obsession for one of the local officers, Ronan O’Connor, a reformed criminal looking to make up for his questionable past. When he gets word of the Bell killer’s location he disregards all calls to wait for backup and pursues the criminal himself. However things don’t go as planned and in an instant things take a dark turn with Ronan thrown out a window and his life unceremoniously ended by his own weapon. Now, as he lies trapped between this world and the next, Ronan is compelled to find out who his killer is.

Visually Murdered: Soul Suspect is a dark and dreary place with the whole game taking place during the course of a single night. The graphics are about average when you compare it to similar titles of its time, a lot of the style still rooted in the previous generation’s console limitations. This might also be partly due to the use of the Unreal 3 engine which always seems to have a similar visual feel no matter the art styling. The styling of the UI elements seems to be of much poorer quality than the rest of the game, to the point of being quite distracting. I understand that at least some of this was done to enhance the “supernatural” feel of the game but since it’s not consistent throughout the various elements it just ends up sticking out more than anything.

Murdered Soul Suspect Review Screenshot Wallpaper Your Untimely Demise

Murdered: Soul Suspect is a puzzle game, one that requires you to gather up all the clues you can find and then use them in order to piece together what happened at a particular scene. Typically the clues are just things lying around the room, waiting for you to interact with them, although some will require a little more detective work in order to unlock them. Whilst the world isn’t particularly big you are free to explore pretty much all of it at your leisure although some places will be unavailable to you until you’ve unlocked some of your ghost abilities further down the line. There’s also numerous side quests and collectible missions which unlock various other stories that aren’t related to the main campaign, something which bolsters Murdered: Soul Suspects otherwise drastically short play time.

The puzzles that you’ll solve really aren’t that difficult at all considering that you’re told what area you need to look in to find them (moving out of an area where a clue might be removes the clue counter, indicating you’ve wandered too far) and that relevant clues typically come with a “memory flash” of what happened. These flashes sometimes come with another word puzzle element which has you choosing a few words to describe the picture you’re seeing. The hardest part then comes from selecting the right clues to complete the investigation or figuring out how to influence someone in order to get the  clue you need. Indeed the only time I struggled to finish investigations was when the game decided not to spawn the required objects for me to interact with, something I’ll touch on later.

Murdered Soul Suspect Review Screenshot Wallpaper Posses The Table

There are open world aspects to Murdered: Soul Suspect as well, allowing you to run around Salem looking for collectibles and helping out other ghosts that find themselves trapped in this realm. You can also posses people and read their minds, which sounds fun to begin with, however after a while you start to find that many NPCs are reused throughout the game and, despite their different circumstances in which you find them, they always have the same few lines to say. I feel like there’s something of a missed opportunity here as it would’ve added a little something more to the world to be able to influence the random people on the street or if there was another story you could unlock by reading enough minds. Sadly there isn’t and so after the first hour or so you’ll likely find yourself skipping all non-essential ghost power use.

Murdered: Soul Suspect is also rather glitchy as the screenshot above will attest to. There are numerous times when NPCs just won’t spawn or will spawn but won’t be visible or in the location where the game wants them to be. You can often resolve this issue by restart from a checkpoint but other times, like during an investigation, you’ll be left wandering around in circles wondering where the last clue is or clicking on clues you’ve already discovered hoping they’ll trigger something else. For a game that struggles with pacing at the best of times this isn’t a great glitch to have and it definitely had a negative impact on my experience.

Murdered Soul Suspect Review Screenshot Wallpaper Horror Stories

However Murdered: Soul Suspect’s greatest failing is that the story just fails to captivate you in any way. On the surface the concept sounds pretty amazing, you’re a ghost detective solving your own murder, however I simply failed to empathize with the majority of the characters. There was massive potential here to give the characters incredible depth using the mind reading mechanic which unfortunately seems to be used to pad the game time out. Worst still the characters that were seemingly given the most attention, in terms of backstory development, are the ones with the least amount of presence in the actual game, being constrained to journal entries. Honestly my hopes weren’t that high for an emotional rollercoaster but I have to say that the overall story felt very lacklustre which is only amplified by the sub-par mechanics.

It’s a real shame because the side stories, typically the ones you unlock from collecting a bunch of artifacts in a particular area, are actually quite good. This was probably the only reason I pursued most of them down as they are the shining moments in Murdered: Soul Suspect, both in terms of their stories as well as the voice acting behind them. Again it feels like another one of the game’s missed opportunities as these stories are a part of the history of this game’s world and yet they’re limited to 5 minute reading sessions that are only unlocked through a tedious collecting mechanic. I don’t have a good idea as to how they could be worked in but suffice to say that Airtight Games would do well to replicate what they did in those stories in the main campaign.

Murdered Soul Suspect Review Screenshot Wallpaper Its Time

Murdered: Soul Suspect unfortunately fails to achieve the goals it set out to do, delivering a mediocre story behind trivial puzzle mechanics whilst hiding its best aspects in a tedious treasure quest. I won’t deny that I had my hand in this as when I heard about the concept I immediately started drawing comparisons to Heavy Rain in my head and there are few games, in my mind, that come close. Still even taking that into consideration Murdered: Soul Suspect feels like a decidedly average game, failing to evoke the kind of emotional investment required by a game of this nature.

Rating: 6/10

Murdered: Soul Suspect is available on PC, PlayStation3, PlayStation4, Xbox360 and XboxOne right now for $49.99, $79.95, $99.95, $79.95 and $99.95 respectively. Game was played entirely on the PC with 7 hours of total play time and 83% of the achievements unlocked.

Thief: Subtly Only Gets You So Far.

The gold standard for stealth game play has, and probably always will be, the original Thief series. It wasn’t that it was one of the first games to get stealth mechanics right, I believe that title belongs to the Metal Gear series (even though I’ve never played any of them), more that the blend of mechanics, cues and emphasis on finesse rather than force made the series stand out amongst its peers. It’s been a very long time between drinks for the series though with the last title, Thief: Deadly Shadows, being released almost a decade ago. The latest instalment, Thief, is an attempt to reboot the series for a modern audience something which may be at odds at the long time fans of the master thief Garret

Thief Review Screenshot Wallpaper Title Screen

After taking a job from Basso, Garrett’s only friend and contact for all this nefarious and underworldly, you find yourself atop a glorious manor accompanied by your former apprentice Erin. However something doesn’t feel right about this particular job as you witness something strange, an otherworldly ritual that shakes the very world. You’re just about to pull out when Erin, who was watching the ritual from on top of a glass dome, falls. You try to save her but it’s too late and she falls down right into the middle of the ritual, disappearing from sight. Suddenly it’s a year later and you have no recollection of what has happened.

Thief certainly impresses graphically as all the environments pack in an incredible amount of detail, something which is key to the core game play mechanics. There’s atmospheric and lighting effects everywhere which can turn some of the most dull environments into wonderful screenshot bait. Having said all that I feel like it could’ve been better as whilst they’re definitely on the upper end of the scale there are some sections where it’s obvious that sacrifices had to be made for the large number of platforms that were targeted. This did mean that I rarely had any performance issues but I’m usually happy to sacrifice that for a little more eye candy.

Thief Review Screenshot Wallpaper Many Avenues of Attack

Unsurprisingly Thief is a stealth game, one where the objective of your current quest can be completed in a variety of different ways. The tools you have at your disposal are wide and varied, ranging from tools that will help keep you concealed to weapons of massive destruction. There’s also two different upgrade systems that allow you to tailor Garrett’s abilities to your play style of choice allowing you to become the master of the shadows or a brutal predator that lurks around every corner. Indeed whilst Thief’s pedigree is in stealthy game play either play style seems viable, even a mix of both if either one of them starts to wear on you.

In terms of retaining the trademark feel that all Thief games have this latest instalment does it quite well. Whilst the environments aren’t exactly massive open world sandboxes like Assassin’s Creed there’s enough back alleys, secret pathways and rooms with tantalizingly locked doors to make the maps feel a lot bigger than they actually are. Thief certainly rewards players who take the time to go over everything with a fine tooth comb which I’m sure a lot of players will find rewarding. On the flip side it never feels like this is a necessary part of the game as you’ll find more than enough resources to keep you going if you just meander off the beaten trail once in a while. Whilst this might annoy the purists the inclusion of a custom difficulty mode turns this optional but rewarding task into a necessity, something which should keep them at bay.

Thief Review Screenshot Wallpaper Why Is There Always a Log

The combat in Thief is understandably lacklustre, mostly because it’s obvious that out and out fighting isn’t the game’s preferred way of completing objectives. This is in stark contrast to other similar stealth games of recent memory (most notably Dishonored) where both paths were somewhat viable. You’ve still got the choice of killing or knocking people out to achieve your objective but should you find yourself discovered there’s really no way to get yourself out of that situation without finding a nearby hidey hole. I don’t necessarily count this against Thief as out and out combat is not what the series, nor the genre itself, is usually about. The option is there but its a blunt instrument in comparison to all the other tools you have at your disposal.

The stealth, on the other hand, is quite marvelous. With the highly detailed maps peppered with vents, corridors and passageways it’s guaranteed that every obstacle you encounter has multiple ways to bypass it. Indeed every time I found myself struggling with a particular section it was always because I wasn’t noticing the alternate path that was right before me, opening up options I didn’t know I had previously. There are some situations where trade offs have to be made though which can lead to some frustration but realistically it’s just about making the choice that’s right for your particular playstyle.

Thief Review Screenshot Wallpaper Locking Picking

The game is well executed for the most part with no major bugs or glitches to report however the control scheme does feel a little bit awkward. Using the lean out ability can be a real exercise in frustration, especially if you wanted to pick something up from a chest or box instead of peeking around it. The same can be said for cancelling things, which can be right click or another key, leading to some heat of the moment confusion. Additionally dropping off a rope can’t be done with space if there’s no nearby ledge and instead must be done with X. It just feels like the interface lacks consistency and makes the more routine parts of the game harder than they need to be. This is somewhat excusable in survival horror games but it’s also one of the reasons that I have a tendency to dislike that genre.

Thief’s story is decidedly middle of the road sharing some similar threads to those of previous instalments in the series (secret society conspiracies laced with bits of magic) but there’s nothing particularly memorable about it. The initial build up in the opening scenes is far too short for us to have any emotional investment in the main characters and seems to rely on our previous experiences with the series to derive most of its impact. It simply doesn’t work as the vast majority of people playing this game haven’t been involved with the Thief series for the better part of a decade and much of the detail is lost to the ages. I’m a firm believer that a good story can make up for nearly any shortcomings that a game might have but unfortunately for Thief that isn’t the case and it’s lucky that it’s so strong mechanically.

Thief Review Screenshot Wallpaper Where To From Here

F or a series that hasn’t seen a release in 10 years Thief delivers a solid game play experience, modernizing many mechanics without incurring the usual penalty of simplifying them too greatly for mass adoption. Thief doesn’t rely heavily on its pedigree in order to deliver a good experience, being able to create its own distinct identity through it’s well executed game mechanics. Unfortunately the story is the giant black mark on an otherwise highly polished experience, leaving this and many other reviewers wanting. Still it’s hard for me to recommend against playing Thief as it really is a solid game, just don’t play it for the story.

Rating: 7.8/10

Thief is available right now on PC, Xbox360, XboxOne, PlayStation3 and PlayStation4 right now for $49.99, $79.95, $99.995, $79.95 and $99.95 respectively. Game was played on the PC on the Thief difficulty with 11 hours of total play time and 35% of the achievements unlocked.

Cloud Enhanced Gaming is a Stupendously Bad Idea.

The advent of cloud computing, or more generally the commoditization of computer infrastructure, has provided us with capabilities that few could have accurately predicted. Indeed the explosive growth in the high tech sector can be substantially attributed to the fact that businesses now do not require heavy capital injections in order to validate their ideas, allowing many ideas which wouldn’t have been viable 5 years ago to flourish today. Of course this has also led to everyone seeking to apply the ideals of cloud computing wherever they can, hoping it can be the panacea to their ills. One such place is in the world of gaming and in all honesty the ways in which its being used is at best misguided with most solutions opening us up to a world of hurt not too far down the track.

Square Enix Project FlareI’ve gone on record saying that I don’t believe the general idea of Cloud Gaming, whereby a service runs hardware in a central location and users connect to it with a streaming device, isn’t viable. The problem comes from the requirements placed on that infrastructure, specifically the requirement for a low latency which means a user can’t be too far away from the equipment. That would mean that for it to have global reach it would likely need some kind of hardware in all capital cities which would be a rather capital intensive exercise. At the same time the consolidation ratios for gaming level hardware aren’t particularly great at the moment, although that may change in the future with both NVIDIA and AMD working on cloud GPU solutions. Still the fact that OnLive, a once $1 billion company, failed to make the idea feasible says a lot about it.

That hasn’t stopped companies from attempting to integrate the cloud through other avenues something which I’ve come to call Cloud Enhanced gaming. This is where a game can offload less latency sensitive aspects of the game to servers elsewhere so they can do the calculations, sending the results back down the wire. In theory this allows you to make your game better as you don’t have to worry about the limitations of the platform you’re running on, using more of that local grunt for pretty graphics while all the grunt work is done offsite. The latest entrant into this arena is Square-Enix’s Project Flare which they’re marketing as a technological breakthrough in cloud gaming.

On the surface it sounds like a great idea; consoles would no longer suffer from their hardware limitations and thus would remain viable for much longer than they have in the past. Indeed for a developer that’s looking to do something that’s outside of a consoles capabilities offloading processing into the cloud would seem to be the only way to accomplish it should they want to use a specific platform over the alternatives. However doing so binds that game to that backend infrastructure which means that the game’s life is only as long as the servers that power it. Considering the numerous examples we’ve had recently of game servers and services disappearing (including the infamous Games for Windows Live) the effect of turning off an integral part of the game would be far worse and likely without an easy path for remediation.

The reason why this would be such a big issue is that when compared to traditional game server infrastructure the requirements for a cloud enhanced game are much, much greater. You can happily run dozens of virtual servers that service thousands of clients from a single dedicated box, however try and run physics calculations (like in one of the Project Flare demos) and the number of people you can service per server drops dramatically. This means the time in which those servers remain fiscally viable is dramatically reduced and it’s far more likely that the service will cease to exist much sooner than other game servers would. Moore’s Law goes a little way to remedy this but you can’t really get past the fact that the consolidation ratios achievable with this are a couple of orders of magnitude lower than what developers have traditionally come to expect.

This is not to mention how the system will handle poor Internet connections or overloaded servers, something which is guaranteed to happen with more popular titles. Whilst its not an unsolvable problem it’s definitely something that will lead to sub-par gaming experiences as the two most likely systems (stopping the game to wait for the calculations to arrive or simply not simulating them at all) will be anything but seamless. I’m sure it could be improved over time however the way this is marketed makes it sound like they want to do a lot of computation elsewhere so the console graphics can be a lot prettier leaving not a whole lot of wiggle room when the inevitable happens.

Whilst this idea is far more feasible than running the entire game environment on a server it’s still a long way from being a viable service. It’s commendable that Square-Enix are looking for ways to make their games better, removing restrictions of the platforms that the majority have chosen, however I can’t help but feel it’s going to come around to bite them, and by extension us, in the ass in the not too distant future. As always I’d love to be proven wrong on this but the fact is that farming out core game calculations means that the game’s life is tied to that service and once it’s gone there’s nothing you can do to restore it.

When Only Tens of Millions Will Suffice: Square Enix’s Expectation Problem.

The AAA game industry is unquestionably a hit-based business and consequently that means there isn’t a lot of room in the market for dozens of companies to compete successfully. Whilst there are many companies making a rather good living from such games, able to deliver title after title that will sell 10 million+ copies, they’re predominately sequels in established IPs who’s success stems largely from their dedicated fan base. Smaller publishers with larger aspirations are still quite numerous though with many of them burning through untold amounts of capital in the hopes of replicating such success. As far as I can tell this way of doing business isn’t sustainable but that doesn’t mean that quality titles have to disappear.

Square Enix Sales FY2013

Square Enix recently published its sales figures for its last 3 big hit games and for plebs like me they don’t look too shabby. Indeed there are many titles I know of with lesser sales figures that were considered wildly successful and I’m not just talking about runaway indie hits. Heavy Rain, for example, would be considered easily around the same level of quality as any of the above titles and it has managed to snag some 2 million sales over the course of its life. Quantic Dream had said previously that their expectations were more around the 200~300,000 mark so the order of magnitude increase was completely unexpected, showing that big sales aren’t required to produce polished games. Turning back to Square Enix then you have to wonder what drove them to expect much higher sales, especially in light of their past performance.

I think the main reason is the amount of capital they invest in these titles, thinking that will have a direct causative effect on how many sales they’ll get out of it at the end. Whilst this is true to a point I don’t think that Square Enix is doing this efficiently as whilst their games are objectively good (on par with those who’s sales are much higher) most of them simply lack the dedicated community which drives those massive sales. In that regard then Square Enix needs to drastically cut either its overall sales expectations and rework their game development budgets accordingly because if selling multiple millions of copies isn’t profitable¹ then you’ve got to seriously reconsider your current business practices.

Indeed I feel this is a major issue with the games industry today. Many of the bigger titles are developed with big sales in mind and that means both developers and publishers aren’t willing to take risks on titles that might not perform. Sure we get a few token efforts from them every so often but it’s a sign of how little innovation there is from the big guys when the indie developers are able to churn them out by the truck load. I’m not saying its better or worse if either side of the industry does the innovation, more that the big developers and publishers are stuck in a rut of churning out sequels or, in the case of Square Enix, thinking they’ll make it big if they copy the formula.

¹They haven’t said that any of these titles weren’t profitable but their predicted $138 million dollar loss this year would seem to indicate that none of them were. The loss could also be heavily influenced by the redevelopment of their failed Final Fantasy MMORPG FFXIV, but the breakdown didn’t go into this unfortunately.

Quantum Conundrum: Curiously Cute, In A Quirky Way.

The advent of modern physics engines really opened up a whole new world of games that simply weren’t possible before. Whilst there has always been puzzle platformer games rarely did they have the level of complexity and ability to give rise to emergent behaviour like games with more realistic environments are today. Games like Portal are the perfect embodiment of this idea and Kim Swift, the game designer behind that title, has brought out another curious puzzle platformer: Quantum Conundrum. With such a pedigree behind it Quantum Conundrum deserves a look in and I gave it a play through over the last weekend.

Quantum Conundrum takes place inside Quadwrangle Manor, the home of a brilliant scientist who’s designed all sorts of wonderful inventions. You play as his 12 year old mute nephew who was dropped off at the manor to stay with your brilliant scientist uncle because your mother believes he needs the company. Upon arrival however he fails to meet you in the front hallway with one of his latest inventions like he always does and the manor suffers a power outage, seemingly trapping your scientist uncle in an alternate dimension. He is however still able to communicate with you through the security system and he guides you through his manor as you work to restore power and hopefully restore him back to the real world.

Right from the start Quantum Conundrum invokes that same feeling I had when playing the first portal game. Certainly Quantum Conundrum shares some of the same aesthetics that the Portal series did with some of the assets looking very similar to their Portal cousins. The level layout and disembodied voice following you constantly are also very similar which further adds to that bizzaro Portal world feeling. Graphically though it’s nothing particularly complex although the vibrant colour palette, heavy stylization, dynamic lighting and use of motion blur makes the whole package visually pleasing even if the graphics aren’t exactly cutting edge.

Quantum Conundrum’s main game mechanic revolves around the use of 4 dimensions that have different properties to that of the normal world. The first one you’re introduced to is the fluffy dimension, essentially a world where everything looks quilted and is as light as a feather. This allows you to move objects that you wouldn’t be able to otherwise, usually to trigger switches or use said objects as a stepping stone. The second dimension is the heavy dimension which is in essence the opposite of the fluffy dimension. However the heavy dimension also makes all objects more dense, preventing them from being destroyed by the lasers that are usually present everywhere. The heavy dimension can also be used to trigger switches with objects that wouldn’t usually trigger them opening up a fair few more possibilities for solving puzzles.

The third dimension you’re given access to is one where time flows at a very slow rate compared to the normal world. In this dimension you can watch switches activate, laser beams slowly power down and even use it to throw an item and then jump on top of it enabling you to catapult yourself across vast distances. The final dimension is one where gravity is switched around making all objects float to the ceiling. This is usually used in order to get objects into a position where you can hop onto them, making the platformer aspect of Quantum Conundrum quite mind bending at times.

Individually all these mechanics are interesting but hardly original as nearly all of those ideas have appeared in other games in one form or another (I can certainly remember things like that in the Half Life series of games). However any of them in combination turns what would appear to be a simple puzzle into an intriguing web of complexity especially when you consider the emergent behaviour that’s present in many of the puzzles. If I’m honest I got the most enjoyment out of the puzzles that utilized all 4 of the dimensions together as they were some of the most satisfying to solve.

One of the puzzles I can remember was late in the game and required you to ride a cube up to the exit door. However in order to do so you’d have to throw it through a grid of lasers which meant that you first had to switch to the fluffy dimension (in order to throw it) and then quickly switch to the heavy dimension (so it didn’t get zapped by the lasers) and then slow down time (so you could jump on top of it) and then finally alternate the gravity in order to ride the cube up to the door. It took me more than a couple tries to get it right but it was one of the most satisfying puzzles I’ve done in quite a long time.

Like any of these physics based games there’s always a few quirks to go along with the intended game play. More than once I had robots bug out on me (one I’m thinking of in particular was there to destroy safes I had dropped on the ground) meaning that the puzzle didn’t function as intended. Restarting from a check point solved this problem but after spending 5 to 10 minutes trying to solve the puzzle to find it is bugged can be quite frustrating. There were also a couple puzzles that seemed to punish you for missing things at the start, forcing you to retry the puzzle from the very start. Thankfully both these problems aren’t common but they were enough to see me put the game down a couple times during my 6.5 hours with it.

There also seems to be something weird with the collision detection on the player character and all the other surfaces in the game. There were many times when I fell to my death when I hit the jump key but my character didn’t jump even though, from what I could tell at least, I was still on the platform I was trying to jump from. This isn’t an uncommon issue with puzzle platformers so its usually just a meta-game of figuring out when to hit the jump key in order to make the jump. It’s rather frustrating at first but towards the end you don’t really notice it until you miss a critical jump by mistiming your jump.

Whilst Portal had a some semblance of a story behind it the plot of Quantum Conundrum is really only there to serve as a motivator to dive deeper and deeper into the Quadwrangle Manor. It’s kind of campy with everything about the entire ordeal seemingly ludicrous and the disembodied voice of your uncle holding quite a bit of contempt for you the entire time doesn’t really endear him as a character to you. It’s in stark contrast to Portal where I felt for the main character and enjoyed the ridiculous contempt that the main protagonist showed for my character, as did everyone else who played the game.

However the story doesn’t really matter so much as Quantum Conundrum excels on its game play alone showing Kim Swift’s trademark of making puzzlers with mechanics that start off simple but become incredibly complex as the game progresses on. I can’t say that Quantum Conundrum had me pegged to my seat like the original Portal did as I finished it over the course of 3 separate sittings but I did find the puzzles enjoyable, especially the later ones. There is of course a whole other game outside that of the main story of Quantum Conundrum in collecting all the collectables and getting all the achievements and if you’re the kind of insane completionist that loves this sort of thing then Quantum Conundrum is definitely for you.

Rating: 8.0/10

Quantum Conundrum is available right now on PC, Xbox360 and PS3 right now for $14.99 or equivalent on all platforms. Game was played entirely on the PC with 5 hours of total play time with 36% of the achievements unlocked.